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Birds do tend to sit longer when it is very cold or icy. The decision to fly in such conditions is a trade-off between degree of threat and the energy expenditure of flight. So, the threat (you) is allowed to get closer than normal.

——Bill Eddleman, Cape Girardeau 

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On Feb 11, 2021, at 5:17 PM, Maureen Thomas-Murphy <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


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I tend to agree with the author of the article that Margy forwarded—a tame bird could very well be a sick or dying one.  While not a siskin, I had a male rose-breasted grosbeak that sat on my feeder for 30+ minutes at a time, several times a day during this year’s migration.  It did not move when I’d go out near the feeder and it stayed around for 2-3 weeks.  After not seeing it for a couple of days, I found a dead one under a bush and suspect it may have been the same bird.

Maureen

St Louis

 

From: Missouri Wild Bird Forum <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf Of Mark Gutchen
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2021 3:43 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Brave Pine Siskin?

 

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A few years ago a pine Siskin actually landed on the bird feeder and ate it’s fill while I was holding the feeder, carrying it to my bird seed bin and filling up the feeder. The bird was not phased in the least by my activity.

Mark Gutchen

Columbia, MO

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On Feb 11, 2021, at 11:18 AM, Margy Terpstra <[log in to unmask]> wrote:



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Good morning all,

 

A friend sent me this link regarding Pine Siskins and Salmonellosis. It was in the Spokane, WA paper. After reading it, we cleaned all our feeders again and hope to prevent this here. We have 26 PISI today, numbers have been fluctuating. That said, the birds are quite tame when I approach the feeders, too. We were working on the bubbler pond one day and two came  down to get a drink while we were right there. 

 

 

Good brrrrrrrding….

Margy Terpstra

Kirkwood, St. Louis CO, MO

 



On Feb 11, 2021, at 8:36 AM, Steve Griffaw <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

 

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With a feeder about to run out today and the other two low enough to refill, especially with the even colder  days coming, just went out to refill the feeders.   Completed the Thistle feeder, the Safflower feeder, then move over the sunflower feeder.  Reached up to take it off the hook and saw on the other side of the perch ring was a Pine Siskin,  I am at best a foot away.  I saw it blinking and moving his body around but he stayed on the perch.  It seemed okay but found it very odd it did not leave.  A day or two ago I saw a Pine Siskin on the same feeder with snow and ice on its back.  Not sure if it got knocked on its back from falling elsewhere or when the snow came down.  I had seen another Sisken or perhaps the same maybe a month ago on the ground that I got within about three feet and then it only moved on the ground a little bit.  Perhaps also the same.

 

Anyway, I tried to wait to see if it would leave and it did not, so I lifted the feeder off the hook to refill then it finally flew off to the nearest tree.  I am glad it was at least healthy enough to fly off or was not somehow frozen on the ring, but I have to think something is wrong.  This was definitely a first.

 

Steve Griffaw

Jefferson City MO

 


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The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners

ABA Birding Code of Ethics


The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners

ABA Birding Code of Ethics


The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners

ABA Birding Code of Ethics


The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners

ABA Birding Code of Ethics