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> On Sep 2, 2020, at 12:32 , Lawrence Herbert <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> A clerk at a store told me that last year he had a dead hummingbird under
> a feeder.  He has lots of bees too, and wondered if a bee stung it.
> Has anyone ever heard of this happening?

Hummingbirds seem to know instinctively that bees/wasps are dangerous, and try to avoid contact. That said, I have seen hummers chasing bees away from feeders, without being stung. A sting would likely be fatal. Perhaps this bird overestimated its abilities.

> We have lots of hummingbirds and bees also at our two feeders.

That's easily solved, by using feeders that do not reward bees with a free meal. That means keeping the syrup level out of their reach, a feature built into saucer-type feeders and a few bottle-types, but the common Perky-Pet feeders are notoriously attractive to bees, and Perky-Pet doesn't care as long as people keep buying their much-hyped but hopelessly-flawed products. "Bee guards" are a joke, and I am convinced they are responsible for many bill fractures.

I never see bees at my HummZingers, which also feature built-in ant moats.

Lanny Chambers
Fenton, MO

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