Print

Print


WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.

New Criticism was modish once. So are all methods of reading. The question
is not whether it is new or modish but whether we learn valuable things
with it.
One of the best things I got from being Director of Women's Studies is that
no one can do feminist research or reading without reading across
disciplines. And despite not being much into what gets called "theory," as
if all interpretation were not a form of theory, was spending two hours
once listening to Derrida--thankfully in English.

Why dismiss any "theory" in advance?a
Cheers,
Nancy

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 1:38 PM Richard Seddon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be
> a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT
> System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments,
> clicking links, or responding to this email.
> Probably one of those post modisms designed to show erudition while
> confusing but not informing the reader.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Jul 25, 2020, at 9:14 AM, Materer, Timothy J. <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> 
>
> TS Eliot Society UK @TSEliotSocUK OUT NOW – the 2020 Journal of the TS
> Eliot Society (UK).
>
> http://s699163057.websitehome.co.uk/the-journal-of-the-ts-eliot-society-uk
>
> Essays present either an aesthetic, a biographical or post-secular view of
> TS Eliot.
>
> What does “Post-secular” mean? that you can take Eliot out of his cultural
> context and apply modish critical perspectives?
>
>