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Yes, Virgil is the most refined, much like Eliot, but it’s also fun to read the ruffians on the stairs.

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> On Mar 23, 2020, at 8:15 AM, Rick Parker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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>> On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 16:34:58 +0000, Eugene Schlanger <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Perhaps, someone should ask Kate if she has read Catullus' poetry before suggesting that she read a biography?  There are the poems about nature and goddess worship, like this for Diana https://www.ancient-literature.com/catullus-34-translation.html which may interest a Floridian as that state has a lot of resplendent flora and fauna.  And then there are the love poems he wrote that are in such contrast to the messages about "Roman empire" and power. 
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> I think that we are conscious, in Virgil more than in any other Latin poet – for Catullus and Propertius seem ruffians, and Horace somewhat plebeian, by comparison – of a refinement of manner, springing from a delicate sensibility, and particularly in that test of manners, private and public conduct between the sexes.
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>   T.S. Eliot, "What is a Classic?"