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I don't know how that got cut off. I said that I see no point in trying to
justify his cruelty to Hale.
Nancy

On Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 8:07 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> If you have not gone through this, the "grain of truth" is that we all
> create a fantasy of those we love but,* in this case*, according to
> Lyndall Gordon, *it is not true*:
>
> Gordon, too, found Eliot’s statement belittling of Hale, but also said
> there was a “grain of truth” to his description.
>
> *“We have to think about the fact that all of us, when we’re in love,
> there’s an element of fantasy about the beloved,” Gordon said. “And so,
> what Eliot is doing is rebranding that in a belittling way — it was a
> delusion, it didn’t exist. And that’s not true, when you read the actual
> letters.”*
> *In general, I think Frances Dickey is spot on. But I don't think this is
> any more "beneath" Eliot than his treatment of John Hayward. He was a mixed
> figure, and he was often disloyal and/or unkind to people who loved him.*
>
> *I see no point in *
>
>
>
>
>
>>
>> *On Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 7:37 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
> <[log in to unmask]>> wrote:Why scholars think the unsealed T.S. Eliot
> letters are a big dealBy Joshua Barajas PBS NewsHour Jan 8,
> 2020 https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/why-scholars-think-the-unsealed-t-s-eliot-letters-are-a-big-deal
> <https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/why-scholars-think-the-unsealed-t-s-eliot-letters-are-a-big-deal> CR
> *