Print

Print


One more thing on my Big Year List. I managed to correct all the errors, but I forgot to erase the Common Yellowthroat, Palm Warbler and Leconte's Sparrow from their old place after I entered them in the correct locations. So, just scratch out these species that were erroneously in the chickadees, nuthatches and woodpeckers before I typed them in their correct location. I do appreciate folks letting me know about the errors on the list. Let me know if you find more. 

I should go birding soon. 

Brad Jacobs

On Sun, Jan 6, 2019 at 7:57 AM Robert Jacobs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Thanks to a birding friend from Jefferson City, who  pointed out that I had a few numbers missing and doubled up, and species out of order. I have redone the list and moved the species to their correct taxonomic locations and removed several doubled numbers. I didn't use the very complicated eBird downloaded csv file and in the process of converting all the locations to counties, I did a sorting that messed a few numbers and order of species. 

Brad Jacobs


Below I am sharing my 2018 Big Year bird list. As many of you know I tried to break Tim Barksdale’s 1991 record in 2017 and ended up at 310 species. Tim helped me find several species in 2017 and again in 2018. Many other birders were very helpful in finding new birds, especially vagrants, or joining me in the field on many days. The year 2018 was an amazing year for rare, casual and accidental birds.

I used The Audubon Society of Missouri (ASM) Annotated Checklist as my source for birds and their status. All my observations of rare, casual, and accidental species, as well as many of the common and uncommon species included ID comments on the eBird checklists for review by the eBird reviewer team. I submitted documentation for the casual and accidental species and other species on the Documentation Review List for review by the Missouri Bird Records Committee (MBRC). I especially tried to get photographs of all of the rare, casual, and accidental species or sketched the birds in the field when I wasn’t able to get to my camera in time.

I followed the American Birding Association Recording Rules within the boundaries of Missouri with one exception I used the ASM Checklist for countable species. I didn’t include any species that were considered domestic, zoo escapes, exotic: such as Egyptian Goose, Gray Lag Goose, Black Swan, Mute Swan, Ruddy Shelduck, Common Shelduck, etc. I have seen all of these in Missouri over the past 30 years. I did count Ring-necked Pheasant as it is considered naturalized, but counted no other pheasant species that have been seen in Missouri. I only counted birds that were alive, wild and unrestrained. E.g. the Ruffed Grouse released in 2018 in Missouri, or bird involved in or influenced by mist-netting or banding operations.  I didn’t count bird’s eggs unless I saw the bird.

In 2017 before I started my 2018 Big Year, I listed 6 items that I hoped to accomplish in 2018 by doing a Big Year.

1)      Find more than 314 species of birds in one year.  I did that by 26 September 2018. 

2)      Get a lot more folks involved in trying to break their previous year's species and checklists totals.

3)      Help birders add some rigor to their observational skills by using multiple ID characters to document and report any bird unusual species so that all birders can learn and replicate the approach.

4)      Report all "good" birds, i.e. birds that others might want to try and locate and do it in a timely fashion.

5)      Document observed MBRC review list species and post on mobirds.org.

6)      Develop and establish a Big Year-like process, structure, special events and rules to follow.

 

While I thoroughly enjoyed 2018, I understand how crazy it was.  Doing a Big Year like Tim did in 1991, and Kendell, Steve, Debbie, and myself did in 2018, when we all passed Tim’s record, might have been a function of an exceptional year for unusual birds to show up in Missouri. I’d like to think it also had a lot to do with eBird and the immediacy of knowing when a bird was reported and where it was observed. I don’t know for sure, but based on all the new birder names on eBird we may also see an increase in unusual bird sightings in the future.

 

I would love to see the Big Year lists of others, including Tim’s from 1991 which I have never seen. I hope you all start thinking about birding, including studying the bird books and finding a mentor to go into the field with.

Below is my Big Year summary of bird species observed in 2018. It includes the species name, number of individuals observed on the date and in the county listed.

       No.       Species                                                    Count        Location                    Date   

1

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck

1

Boone

20-May-18

2

Snow Goose

400

Barton

13-Jan-18

3

Ross's Goose

2

Barton

13-Jan-18

4

Greater White-fronted Goose

360

St Charles

6-Jan-18

5

Cackling Goose

2

Boone

8-Jan-18

6

Canada Goose

25

Boone

3-Jan-18

7

Trumpeter Swan

4

Boone

4-Jan-18

8

Tundra Swan

4

St Charles

6-Jan-18

9

Wood Duck

5

St. Clair

23-Feb-18

10

Blue-winged Teal

2

Greene

2-Mar-18

11

Cinnamon Teal

2

Greene

2-Mar-18

12

Northern Shoveler

43

Boone

9-Jan-18

13

Gadwall

31

Boone

9-Jan-18

14

American Wigeon

4

Boone

9-Jan-18

15

Mallard

75

Macon

5-Jan-18

16

American Black Duck

1

Boone

17-Jan-18

17

Mottled Duck

1

Holt

29-May-18

18

Northern Pintail

2

Clay

20-Jan-18

19

Green-winged Teal

1

St Charles

6-Jan-18

20

Canvasback

6

St Charles

19-Jan-18

21

Redhead

9

Saline

1-Feb-18

22

Ring-necked Duck

50

St Charles

19-Jan-18

23

Greater Scaup

2

St Charles

6-Jan-18

24

Lesser Scaup

10

St Charles

6-Jan-18

25

Surf Scoter

3

Franklin

29-Mar-18

26

White-winged Scoter

1

St Charles

19-Mar-18

27

Black Scoter

1

Clay

19-Nov-18

28

Long-tailed Duck

1

St Charles

18-Nov-18

29

Bufflehead

1

Clay

20-Jan-18

30

Common Goldeneye

2

Macon

5-Jan-18

31

Hooded Merganser

16

St Charles

19-Jan-18

32

Common Merganser

23

St Charles

6-Jan-18

33

Red-breasted Merganser

1

St Charles

17-Feb-18

34

Ruddy Duck

4

St Charles

27-Jan-18

35

Northern Bobwhite

1

St Clair

12-Mar-18

36

Ring-necked Pheasant

1

Saline

18-Mar-18

37

Greater Prairie-Chicken

6

St Clair

22-Mar-18

38

Wild Turkey

13

Taney

3-Feb-18

39

Pied-billed Grebe

1

St Charles

19-Jan-18

40

Horned Grebe

1

Clay

20-Jan-18

41

Red-necked Grebe

1

Boone

10-Apr-18

42

Eared Grebe

1

Boone

9-Apr-18

43

Western Grebe

1

Taney CO

25-Nov-18

44

Rock Pigeon

2

St Charles

6-Jan-18

45

Eurasian Collared-Dove

2

Randolph

4-Jan-18

46

White-winged Dove

2

New Madrid

31-May-18

47

Mourning Dove

2

Boone

1-Jan-18

48

Greater Roadrunner

1

Greene

22-Mar-18

49

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

1

Boone

7-May-18

50

Black-billed Cuckoo

1

Holt

5-Jun-18

51

Common Nighthawk

1

St. Clair

3-May-18

52

Chuck-will's-widow

2

Callaway

5-May-18

53

Eastern Whip-poor-will

1

Boone

16-Apr-18

54

Chimney Swift

1

Greene

12-Apr-18

55

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

2

Laclede

26-Apr-18

56

Rufous Hummingbird

1

Dade

29-Aug-18

57

King Rail

2

Lincoln

23-May-18

58

Virginia Rail

1

Boone

16-Apr-18

59

Sora

1

Boone

9-Apr-18

60

Common Gallinule

1

Boone

20-May-18

61

American Coot

1

Clay

20-Jan-18

62

Yellow Rail

4

St Clair

3-May-18

63

Sandhill Crane

1

St Charles

6-Jan-18

64

Black-necked Stilt

1

St Charles

6-May-18

65

American Avocet

12

Dade

12-Apr-18

66

Black-bellied Plover

1

St Clair

3-May-18

67

American Golden-Plover

2

Boone

20-Mar-18

68

Semipalmated Pl


The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Archives / Subscription options / ASM Website / Email the list owners

ABA Birding Code of Ethics

ASM Spring Meeting: May 3-5, 2019 at Bunker Hill Retreat near Mountain View, MO Details and Online Registration