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Dull sublunary lovers' love 
   (Whose soul is sense) cannot admit 
Absence, because it doth remove 
   Those things which elemented it. 

But we by a love so much refined, 
   That our selves know not what it is, 
Inter-assured of the mind, 
   Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss. 

Our two souls therefore, which are one, 
   Though I must go, endure not yet 
A breach, but an expansion, 
   Like gold to airy thinness beat. 

- John Donne, A VALEDICTION FORBIDDING MOURNING 

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:24 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Donne was writing of powerful sensual desire. Eliot is not. And in "La Figlia" the narrator is imagining abandoning the woman.

Donne understood profound human love.
Nancy

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:12 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Stand on the highest pavement of the stair—

- TS Eliot, LA FIGLIA 

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:03 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Not less of love, 
But expansion of love 
beyond desire. 

- TS Eliot

Our two souls therefore, which are one, 
   Though I must go, endure not yet 
A breach, but an expansion, 
   Like gold to airy thinness beat. 

- John Donne

Eliot from memory only.
CR