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Dull sublunary lovers' love
   (Whose soul is sense) cannot admit
Absence, because it doth remove
   Those things which elemented it.

But we by a love so much refined,
   That our selves know not what it is,
Inter-assured of the mind,
   Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss.

Our two souls therefore, which are one,
   Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion,
   Like gold to airy thinness beat.

- John Donne, A VALEDICTION FORBIDDING MOURNING

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:24 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Donne was writing of powerful sensual desire. Eliot is not. And in "La
> Figlia" the narrator is imagining abandoning the woman.
>
> Donne understood profound human love.
> Nancy
>
> On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:12 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Stand on the highest pavement of the stair—
>>
>> - TS Eliot, LA FIGLIA
>>
>> On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 12:03 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Not less of love,
>>> But expansion of love
>>> beyond desire.
>>>
>>> - TS Eliot
>>>
>>> Our two souls therefore, which are one,
>>>    Though I must go, endure not yet
>>> A breach, but an expansion,
>>>    Like gold to airy thinness beat.
>>>
>>> - John Donne
>>>
>>> Eliot from memory only.
>>> CR
>>>
>>>