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Well, an aspect that still needs to be explored.

CR

On Mon, May 21, 2018 at 10:28 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> It would be difficult to think of a less applicable word for Eliot than
> "feminist." Feminism is a philosophical position, grounded in major
> theoretical work going back at least to Mary Wollstonecraft: it is not a
> simplistic notion of very occasional sympathy (intermixed with one of the
> most misogynist images in all of literature in the Fresca of the
> *Facsimile* "Fire Sermon" or the tendency to dismiss women writers with
> the exception of Marianne Moore and Djuna Barnes for *Nightwood* or a
> poem about strangling a woman).
>
> Putting aside even Wollstonecraft and DeBeauvoir and Rich and the
> courageous women of the Suffrage movement, since *The Feminist Mystique*,
> at least, scholars throughout the world have studied the meaning and
> applications of feminism--the history and analysis is massive now.
>
> None of that is simply an intermittent ability to show potential empathy.
> And to claim the word, one does need to know what it is.
> Nancy
>
> On Mon, May 21, 2018 at 1:08 PM, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Was just thinking of the way Eliot empathizes with the plight of Lil
>> apropos of her husband’s treatment of her, as well as Eliot’s depiction of
>> the agony and travail of the rich lady in the opening section of A Game of
>> Chess. In the Prufrock volume too there’re moving images of women from the
>> low class whose life is no better than “sparrows in the gutters.” Does make
>> a case for Eliot as a feminist.
>>
>> CR
>>
>> On Mon, May 21, 2018 at 11:59 AM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Gemma Cairney on Gender and T.S. Eliot’s ‘The Waste Land’
>>>
>>> https://youtu.be/20B30J5ymV0
>>>
>>>
>>> A welcome comment. Wish there was some elaboration vis-a-vis The Waste
>>> Land.
>>>
>>>
>>> CR
>>>
>>
>