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"Reasons" are not justifications. Everyone tells themselves "reasons."

But we may learn more in 2020 when his letters to Emily are released.

On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 8:31 PM, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Eliot may have his reasons, albeit unbeknownst to us.
>
> CR
>
> On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 8:26 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Why shift to the passive voice? Eliot let her believe by spending 30
>> years in correspondence, visits, and Burnt Norton moments, then simply
>> married Valerie without even telling Hale. It did not just "not
>> culminate"--it was done to her.
>>
>> And I am not the only one who thinks Aeneas did a terrible thing. Aeneas,
>> for one, knew his own guilt. And one early member of the London Virgil
>> Society spent pages on how horrific his actions were and how devastating
>> they were for Dido. Even Eliot acknowledged that Dido was abandoned, though
>> he, as often, found justifications.
>>
>> And yes, the tragedy is Dido's, but the guilt and wrong are Aeneas's. At
>> least they had a very sexual love affair and Aeneas affirmed his own
>> anguish later in Book 6.
>> Nancy
>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 8:13 PM, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Reminds me of Aeneas and Dido.
>>>
>>> CR
>>>
>>> On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 8:10 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> And because it did not culminate in marriage, ended rather tragically
>>>> for her.
>>>>
>>>> CR
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 8:07 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The story is romantic but, for whatever reasons, did not culminate in
>>>>> marriage.
>>>>>
>>>>> CR
>>>>>
>>>>> On Fri, Feb 16, 2018 at 3:22 PM Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Given that Emily Hale always believed Eliot would marry her if he
>>>>>> were free (while still married, and after Vivienne's death that he had
>>>>>> taken a vow of celibacy), and that she believed it for many reasons and
>>>>>> many years--they corresponded for thirty years, and that he visited her in
>>>>>> the US and she visited him in England--and that he then married Valerie
>>>>>> without telling her and she learned of it--as I recall--from a newspaper,
>>>>>> and that she then had a breakdown, I don't think it is really much of a
>>>>>> Valentine story or about love.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The memories CR quotes are from the day Eliot and Emily went to Burnt
>>>>>> Norton together. But that did not presage any commitment despite the thirty
>>>>>> year relationship (not counting the beginning when he was at Harvard and is
>>>>>> reported to have said he loved her) or seem to mean she might at least have
>>>>>> been informed of the impending marriage.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This story is tragic, not romantic.
>>>>>> Nancy
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Thu, Feb 15, 2018 at 7:16 PM, Cox, Carrol <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I haven't read these posts yet, but the subject line echoed
>>>>>>> something I'd been lazily going over in my head: What was the worst really
>>>>>>> good poem in the English language.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Here are some of the candidates.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Houseman, Epitaph to an Army of Mercenaries
>>>>>>> Yeats, And Irish Airman Forsees His Death
>>>>>>> Yeats, Easter 1916
>>>>>>> Kipling, White Man's Burden
>>>>>>> Rochester, Song of a Young Lady to Her Ancient Lover
>>>>>>> Cowper, The Castaway
>>>>>>> Jonson, To Penshurst
>>>>>>> Newbold, Vitai Lampada
>>>>>>> Perhaps Cowper, The Castaway
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> There are possibly other candidates. Aggressively beautiful poems
>>>>>>> which, in some way, are rotten at their core.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Carol
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> An possibly, Eliot, Portrait of a Lady
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>>>> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>>>>>>> Behalf Of Rickard A. Parker
>>>>>>> Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2018 1:26 PM
>>>>>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>>>>> Subject: The Love Song of T.S. Eliot and Emily Hale
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Based on the "From the Archives" in the title we probably have
>>>>>>> already seen this account of Eliot's visit to Emily Hale at Scripps
>>>>>>> College. It looks like Scripps wanted to add a bit of romance to their
>>>>>>> website on Valentine's Day.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> From the Archives: The Love Song of T.S. Eliot and Emily Hale
>>>>>>> By Joseph Maddrey
>>>>>>> February 14, 2018
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Scripps College (The Women's College)
>>>>>>> Claremont, California
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> http://www.scrippscollege.edu/news/features/from-the-
>>>>>>> archives-the-love-song-of-t-s-eliot-and-emily-hale
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>