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*Et, O ces voix d’enfants, chantant dans la coupole!*

Thanks,
CR

On Sun, Dec 3, 2017 at 6:20 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Incidentally,
>
> Et, O ces voix d’enfants, chantant dans la coupole!
>
>
> http://tseliotsthewasteland.wikia.com/wiki/Et,_O_ces_voix_d%E2%80%99enfants,_chantant_dans_la_coupole
> !
>
> CR
>
> On Sun, Dec 3, 2017 at 11:21 AM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Mystique of Romance
>>
>> *Et, O ces voix d’enfants, chantant dans la coupole!*
>>
>>
>> *the walls*
>>
>> *Of Magnus Martyr hold*
>> *Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold.*
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *The voice of the hidden waterfallAnd the children in the apple-treeNot
>> known, because not looked forBut heard, half-heard, in the stillnessBetween
>> two waves of the sea.  *
>>
>> *the fire and the rose are one *
>>
>> CR
>>
>> On Fri, Dec 1, 2017 at 1:06 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *Dry the pool, dry concrete, brown edged,And the pool was filled with
>>> water out of sunlight,And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,The surface
>>> glittered out of heart of light...Then a cloud passed, and the pool was
>>> empty.*
>>>
>>>
>>> *Go, go, go, said the bird: human kindCannot bear very much reality.*
>>>
>>> This is it.
>>> CR
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 30, 2017 at 6:32 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Classicism of Eliot’s poetry is, in fact, a consummation of
>>>> Romanticism, not its negation. It’s a triumph of imagination.
>>>>
>>>>                                        “Here, said she,
>>>> Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor,
>>>> (Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!)”
>>>>
>>>> The personal here acquires a more universal character without ceasing
>>>> to be personal:
>>>>
>>>>                               “I sat upon the shore
>>>> Fishing, with the arid plain behind me
>>>> Shall I at least set my lands in order?”
>>>>
>>>> And the images soar as much on wings of Romantic poesy:
>>>>
>>>> “The river’s tent is broken: the last fingers of leaf
>>>> Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind
>>>> Crosses the brown land, unheard. The nymphs are departed.”
>>>>
>>>> A transformation of Romanticism, if you like. Its spirit vibrant and
>>>> alive.
>>>>
>>>> CR
>>>>
>>>> On Mon, Nov 27, 2017 at 8:12 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> In point of fact the point I’m making is nothing new. It was raised as
>>>>> earlier as that. It was made by Grover Smith too (TS Eliot’s Poetry and
>>>>> Plays: A Study in Sources and Meaning). Eliot, he wrote, was admittedly a
>>>>> classicist only ‘in tendency.’ Temperamentally a romantic, he abhorred the
>>>>> gap between the actual and the ideal. All the same Eliot paved the way for
>>>>> a new idiom of poetry.
>>>>>
>>>>> CR
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Mon, Nov 27, 2017 at 6:06 PM Cox, Carrol <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The New Poetic: Yeats to Eliot (Classic Criticism) C.K. Stead:
>>>>>> Continuum
>>>>>>
>>>>>> -------
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This alleged "new poetic" is over a century old; in other words,
>>>>>> critics who treat Pound, Eliot, Yeats etc  as "new" are duplicating the
>>>>>> critics of 1920 who regarded Wordsworth and Shelley as the cutting edge of
>>>>>> poetic practice.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Is there anyone on the list deeply familiar with the criticism &
>>>>>> scholarship of the last 20 hears who can give real information on what
>>>>>> 'now' is regard as "new"?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> At the time when LBJ" rape of democracy in the Dominican Republic
>>>>>> abruptly shifted my focus of energy, I was reading Merwin, Snodgrass, et al
>>>>>> as "new," though my personal preferences were Pound & Pope.  And even by
>>>>>> 1965 the "New" critics were looking a bit moldy alongside Frye, Kenner,
>>>>>> Davie, & others.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Carrol
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>