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On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 01:02:25 +0000, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> ARTICLE
>
>*Between Fire and Fire: T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land *
>By Francesca Bugliani Knox
>The Heythrop Journal
>5 December 2014
>
>*Desolatione desolata est omnis terra *
>*Quia nullus est qui recogit corde *
>  (Jeremiah 12: 11)
>
>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/heyj.12240/full
>
>CR
>

Thank's CR. I'll get to it in a bit. Here is the first paragraph of the introduction:

INTRODUCTION
Even traditionally minded critics have maintained that The Waste Land defies a coherent interpretation. ‘No critic,’ Helen Gardner wrote, ‘can provide them [i.e. readers] with a magic thread to take them through the labyrinth. Its connections are not connections of logic, but connections of feeling, often of violent reactions of feeling’ (Gardner 19). Plausible though this may seem, there are reasons to doubt interpretations of this kind. The Waste Land can be interpreted, and by interpreted I mean ‘interpreted’ in a traditional sense, one that Eliot would have recognized (The Frontiers of Criticism 11, 15). This essay aims to show that there is a
‘magic thread’. It may not be one that fits our preconceptions of what a modern poem should be, but it is one that can be substantiated on both biographical and intellectual grounds. The ‘magic thread’ that I have in mind is Eliot’s intellectual interest in religious mysticism, that is, his interest in the peculiar quality of consciousness called, in Eliot’s times and in the circles he frequented, ‘mystical’. By this I do not mean the mysticism associated with the occult or merely
with the Grail legend. The Grail legend is part of the story, but only part. The thread that connects the poem’s themes and details is the mystical Christian tradition popularized by Evelyn Underhill.