Print

Print


And that’s how I’d come to terms with Eliot’s bawdy verse, not just as a flip side to his spiritual poetry, but as one complementary to it. 
Total depravity as an expression of the ‘fallen’ state, and the spiritual mode as a way of redemption. The horror and the glory, Eliot envisaged. 

CR 

On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 3:01 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Total depravity is the fallen state of human beings as a result of original sin. ... However, in Arminian theology prevenient grace (or "enabling grace") does reach through total depravity to enable people to respond to the salvation offered by God in Jesus Christ.
On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:52 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
A better subject line could be: 

TS Eliot: The Horror and the Glory 

CR 

On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:49 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:37 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
TS Eliot rarely ever wrote a character with whom he did not empathize. 
He believed in the fallen state of man from the first. 
And any portrayal of a negative trait in his poetry was to him, 
presumably, an aspect of his own fallen state. 
Thus Sweeney in his poetry was non other than himself. 
One might even hazard a view that saw both Burbank and Bleistein as aspects of the poet. 
Correspondingly, the pluses and the minuses in ‘Gerontion’ belonged to him. 
The proposition is not altogether without a point, I think. Think. 

Here’s a picture, at random, with which I’d choose to preface this thought. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._S._Eliot#/media/File%3AT.S._Eliot%2C_1923..JPG

CR