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And that’s how I’d come to terms with Eliot’s bawdy verse, not just as a
flip side to his spiritual poetry, but as one complementary to it.
Total depravity as an expression of the ‘fallen’ state, and the spiritual
mode as a way of redemption. The horror and the glory, Eliot envisaged.

CR

On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 3:01 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Total depravity is the *fallen* state of human beings as a result of
> original sin. ... However, in Arminian *theology* prevenient grace (or
> "enabling grace") does reach through total depravity to enable people to
> respond to the salvation offered by God in Jesus Christ.
> Total depravity - Wikipedia
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_depravity>
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_depravity>
> On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:52 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> A better subject line could be:
>>
>> TS Eliot: The Horror and the Glory
>>
>> CR
>>
>> On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:49 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> A correct link to the picture
>>>
>>>
>>> https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._S._Eliot#/media/File%3AT.S._Eliot%2C_1923.JPG
>>>
>>> CR
>>>
>>> On Sun, Oct 29, 2017 at 2:37 PM Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> TS Eliot rarely ever wrote a character with whom he did not empathize.
>>>> He believed in the fallen state of man from the first.
>>>> And any portrayal of a negative trait in his poetry was to him,
>>>> presumably, an aspect of his own fallen state.
>>>> Thus Sweeney in his poetry was non other than himself.
>>>> One might even hazard a view that saw both Burbank and Bleistein as
>>>> aspects of the poet.
>>>> Correspondingly, the pluses and the minuses in ‘Gerontion’ belonged to
>>>> him.
>>>> The proposition is not altogether without a point, I think. Think.
>>>>
>>>> Here’s a picture, at random, with which I’d choose to preface this
>>>> thought.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._S._Eliot#/media/File%3AT.S._Eliot%2C_1923..JPG
>>>>
>>>> CR
>>>>
>>>