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I do agree with Carrol.  The otherness of the tyger supports the poem's external questioning as does the change to "Dare frame thy fearful symmetry" in the last stanza from "Could frame thy fearful symmetry" in the first stanza.

NB  Carrol:  But I do also think the Songs of Experience are not dependent upon the Songs of Innocence.  Didn't you also quote the chimney-sweep's poem yesterday?  I hear that independently of the other poems and I suspect even the residents of Slough do too.  Et tu?

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> On Jan 1, 2017, at 10:13 PM, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> David Boyd wrote:
> 
> On 1 Jan 2017, at 22:19, Chanan Mittal  wrote:
> 
> The tiger defines us for what we are. 
> 
> Nonsense. Before you can say that you first have to say what the tiger is? Which features of the tiger define the "essence" of humanity ("we")? Blake is very clear that the Tyger is OTHER than "us"; It is that otherness that allows the Tyger to provoke a question or series of questions -- including the question raised by the simultaneous existenmce of Tyger and Lamb. (The poems of experience make no sense unless the reader pairs them with the poems of innocence.) It is mere mindless flippancy to make such empty statements as "X is us."
> 
> Carrol