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Well, no one has ever questioned the status of The Waste Land as a poem.
But no one has ever called it a 'novel.'

CR

On Friday, June 3, 2016, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> O.K. Try a more specific topic.
>
> Why is the lead editorial in today's WSJ not a poem? (I haven't read it,
> and you can pick some other editorial if you prfer.) The challenge is
> serious: I don't believe you can do it.
>
> Carrol
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:;>] On Behalf Of Ken Armstrong
> Sent: Friday, June 03, 2016 6:49 PM
> To: [log in to unmask] <javascript:;>
> Subject: Re: TS Eliot as a novelist – Megan Quigley
>
>
>
>
>
> On 6/3/2016 6:16 PM, Carrol Cox wrote:
>
>
>         No one has ever succeeded in defining Poetry,
>
>      I love a grand unprovable generalization as much as the next person,
> though if we were going to argue, you'd have to start with a definition of
> "success." But you needn't bother on my account. I'd only point out that
> the author of the paper which elicited my query seems to think there IS a
> difference, and upon which she can presumably explain one (over here) in
> terms of the other (over there). I would just like to see it, and judging
> by her vita, which to be sure is quite impressive, there's a good chance
> "vagueness" is going to work into it somewhere (everywhere?).
>
>  On the oddest of U.S. election seasons I've witnessed and despite my
> general rule not to talk politics on the listserv, this season is so
> downright and outright big-time weird and the emerging candidates so
> unattractive and the stakes so high, I've entertained the same thought you
> have. (Don't worry, probably for different reasons.) I imagine many of us
> have had the thought that, speaking of novelizations, this real life
> adventure is a satirical parody of itself that needs no third party author.
> Just clip the daily newspaper articles, paste them in a large scrapbook,
> and watch the story grow.
>
> Just sayin'...
> Ken A
>
>
>
>         let alone given any meaning to  what is "ineluctably poetry." The
> poetry/prose distinction is a social   construct, not some Platonic
> essence. If we agree to name a text a poem, it is a poem. And if you read
> serious histories of "the novel," you find that there is very little
> agreement as to when "the novel" was invented. I would say that As I Lay
> Dying is as " ineluctably" poetic as TWL.
>
>         But there are more fun things to argue about. Is Clinton or Trump
> the most serious threat to the world? It's a close call, but I suspect
> Clinton would be the more effective evil.
>
>