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Thanks, Ken. I hadn't seen the Wiki translation and just made my own.
The first part of Wiki interpretation is literally closer to the original.
The second part deviates from the original which has a conditional "if".
"When" denotes something that does happen.

Regards,
CR

On Tuesday, April 12, 2016, Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>
>
> On 4/12/2016 11:09 AM, Chanan Mittal wrote:
>
> Incidentally,
>
> On the eve of Baisakhi*
>
> ਵੈਸਾਖੁ ਸੁਹਾਵਾ ਤਾਂ ਲਗੈ ਜਾ ਸੰਤੁ ਭੇਟੈ ਹਰਿ ਸੋਇ ॥੩॥ Vaisaakh Suhaavaa Thaan
> Lagai Jaa Santh Bhaettai Har Soe ||3|| (Ank/Page: 134 Sri Guru Granth
> Sahib) - Wiki
>
> April would only be endeared to the soul if a saint brings about a meeting
> with The Lord.
>
>
>     Interesting, CR. The translation I found following Wikipedia links was
> this:
>
>       The month of Vaisaakh is beautiful and pleasant, when the Saint
> causes me to meet the Lord.
>
>    However, I am completely in the dark. Is the translation in your post
> your own? On first glance it looks like "the Saint" and "a saint" aren't
> equivalent. Any commentary you can offer?
>
>   Ken A
>
>
> "Mixing memory and desire"
>
> CR
>
> (*Baisakh is the month of April in Punjab (India) and 13th of April is the
> day of a festival that celebrates the fruition of crops but also has many
> associations of socio-religious sacrifices.)
>
>
>
> On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Chanan Mittal <
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
>> But "all is always now," announce the Quartets.
>>
>> And this was prefigured too:
>>
>> "Who is the third who walks always beside you?
>> When I count, there are only you and I together
>> But when I look ahead up the white road
>> There is always another one walking beside you
>> Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded
>> I do not know whether a man or a woman
>> —But who is that on the other side of you?"
>>
>> The joy of Easter lingers in the air.
>>
>> CR
>>
>>
>> On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
>> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>>
>>> "O City city, I can sometimes hear
>>> Beside a public bar in Lower Thames Street,
>>> The pleasant whining of a mandoline
>>> And a clatter and a chatter from within
>>> Where fishmen lounge at noon: where the walls
>>> Of Magnus Martyr hold
>>> Inexplicable splendour of Ionian white and gold."
>>>
>>> CR
>>>
>>> On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
>>> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> "In this decayed hole among the mountains
>>>> In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing
>>>> Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel
>>>> There is the empty chapel, only the wind’s home.
>>>> It has no windows, and the door swings,
>>>> Dry bones can harm no one.
>>>> Only a cock stood on the rooftree
>>>> Co co rico co co rico
>>>> In a flash of lightning. Then a damp gust
>>>> Bringing rain"
>>>>
>>>> CR
>>>>
>>>> On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
>>>> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Memory, you have the key.
>>>>> Indeed.
>>>>> CR
>>>>>
>>>>> On Sunday, April 10, 2016, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
>>>>> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> "April is the cruelest month, breeding
>>>>>> lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
>>>>>> memory and desire, stirring
>>>>>> dull roots with spring rain."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ("He who was living is now dead")
>>>>>>
>>>>>> And vis-a-vis "spring rain" the memory and desire of another April:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "WHAN that Aprille with his shoures soote
>>>>>> The droghte of Marche hath perced to the roote,
>>>>>> And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
>>>>>> Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
>>>>>> Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
>>>>>> Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
>>>>>> The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
>>>>>> Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
>>>>>> And smale fowles maken melodye,
>>>>>> That slepen al the night with open ye,
>>>>>> (So priketh hem nature in hir corages:
>>>>>> Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
>>>>>> And palmers for to seken straunge strondes,
>>>>>> To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;
>>>>>> And specially, from every shires ende
>>>>>> Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,
>>>>>> The holy blisful martir for to seke,
>>>>>> That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke."
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Well a thought that has prefigured many a time vis-a-vis the opening
>>>>>> lines of 'The Waste Land.'
>>>>>>
>>>>>> CR
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>