Print

Print


It's a fresh take on "spring rain" in the opening lines, Ken.
Was just reconsidering your observation today and it sounded revelatory.

CR

On Saturday, April 16, 2016, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> "In this decayed hole among the mountains
> In the faint moonlight, the grass is singing
> Over the tumbled graves, about the chapel
> There is the empty chapel, only the wind’s home.
> It has no windows, and the door swings,
> Dry bones can harm no one.
> Only a cock stood on the roof-tree
> Co co rico co co rico
> In a flash of lightning. Then a damp gust
> Bringing rain"
>
> Cheers,
>  CR
>
> On Saturday, April 16, 2016, Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
>> Following CR's operatic Vivienne links I found this on the UK Eliot
>> Society's site:
>>
>>
>> http://www.eliotsociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/CdqnhkUWAAAhJn1.jpg
>>
>> At first I thought that might not be a welcome sight first thing driving
>> to work just before daybreak. Then I noticed, it being writ so large, that
>> the stage is after all set by a wakening spring rain. The roots may be
>> dull, but they're being stirred. An opening note of hopefulness arcing over
>> the waste land?
>>
>> Ken A
>>
>> On 4/15/2016 9:48 AM, Chanan Mittal wrote:
>>
>>> Operatic Song Cycle 'Vivienne'
>>> http://www.eliotsociety.org.uk/tseliot-news/
>>>
>>