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Still not quite there.  Lots of animals feign inactivity. Why choose this one in particular?
P.

On 11 Oct 2015 6:52 am, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
From Rick's find:

The nicknames were no mistake — Pound viewed himself as a brash risk-taker, while he considered Eliot’s reserve to be quietly subversive. True to form, Eliot even signed one of his letters “Tar Baby” (as in the story where the “Tar-Baby ain’t sayin’ nothin'”).

http://www.wrensnest.org/make-it-new-the-uncle-remus-inspired-letters-of-t-s-eliot-and-ezra-pound/

Pound, I guess, would liken Tom to a possum for he (Tom) partook of that animal's behavioral trait of feigning ignorance, sleep or death as a defensive tactic. 

CR

On Sunday, October 11, 2015, Rickard A. Parker <raparker@theworld.com> wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2015 02:12:21 -0700, P <xanadu01@TELUS.NET> wrote:

> So CR,  any idea why Pound nicknamed Eliot Ol' Possum?

I took 60% of this query (why Pound nicknamed Eliot Ol' Possum) and stuck it into Google. The first hit explained it:
   http://www.wrensnest.org/make-it-new-the-uncle-remus-inspired-letters-of-t-s-eliot-and-ezra-pound/

The second hit was scholarly:
   The Dialect of Modernism: Race, Language, and Twentieth-century Literature
   By Michael North
   Old Possum and Brer Rabbit: Pound and Eliot's Racial Masquerade
   https://books.google.com/books?id=urxqG-ibZQ4C&pg=PA77&lpg=PA77

Regards,
   Rick Parker