Print

Print


So that is it. Thanks, P.
CR

On Tuesday, August 25, 2015, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Pound was more popular because he wasn't Christian. Some folks really saw
> Eliot as a traitor becoming a Christian after writing the manifesto of the
> secular age.
>
> P.
> On 24 Aug 2015 6:55 pm, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> I have never seen anyone here rant against Pound. Eliot was a lamb in
> comparison.
>
> CR
>
> On Monday, August 24, 2015, P <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> Mercy for publish or perishers.
> P.
> On 24 Aug 2015 1:21 pm, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> True, but he did.
> N
>
> >>> P 08/24/15 4:20 PM >>>
>
> And if Eliot hadn't written TWL we probably wouldn't have the critics or
> the biographers either.
> P.
> On 24 Aug 2015 12:36 pm, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> If you think Lyndall Gordon and Peter Ackroyd  and Robert Crawford are
> parasites, fine. But biographies are about lives, not just poems, so if you
> write a biography, you write about the life. And lives do deeply affect
> what an author writes. Had Eliot not spent summers on the Mass. coast and
> sailed up past Maine to the straits of Belle Isle, we would almost
> certainly not have those powerful images at the end of "Gerontion" or the
> haunting ones in "Marina" or the fishmen who "lounge at noon" or the Dry
> Salvages. "Marina" describes the ocean off the coast of Maine; it's very
> vivid and accurate. Eliot sailed there. I live there, and it is accurate
> and evocative. The idea that poems come out of nothing experienced by the
> poet makes no sense.
>
> No one ever suggested conversion by the way.
> Nancy
>
> >>> P 08/24/15 3:07 PM >>>
>
> It is much preferable to look at the facts & ignore the opinion, based or
> baseless. Even more preferable is focusing on the poetry & leaving the rest
> for the parasites to crawl all over each other about.
>
> I wonder if Eliot's antisemitic streak ever converted anyone to
> antisemitism. BTW, antisemitism includes all the Semites, not just the
> Jews, does it not?
>
> P.
> On 24 Aug 2015 11:49 am, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> No it isn't. Some opinions are based on facts and some are just
> speculation. Readers need to sift those, not just assume the truthiness is
> all.
> Nancy
>
> >>> P 08/24/15 2:46 PM >>>
>
> It's all a matter of opinion anyway.
> P.
> On 24 Aug 2015 7:33 am, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
>
> Much of this review is generally knowledgeable and useful, but it ends on
> a weird note. A biography is by definition the story of a life, and it is
> not meant to be "finished" and "polished" at the expense of the life
> itself. Anyone who has read Eliot's harshly negative comments on women
> writers or his poetry on Fresca and the disgusting Bolo and "Gross
> Lulu" poems, let alone the facts of his relations with Emily Hale,
> Vivienne, and Mary Trevelyan would be a bit surprised to know that gender
> is of passing interest. And anyone who has read *After Strange Gods *or
> the lifelong influence of Charles Maurras would find exclusion of the issue
> of Jews simply dishonest. There is no need at all to look to other
> scholars--though ignoring Lyndall Gordon, or Ken Ascher on Maurras, would
> be a failure in itself--to find gender and anti-Semitism as issues. One
> need only read Eliot's own writings.
>
> To call this a miscue is to call for idealizion, not biography. And to
> object to other scholars in a scholarly biography is equally strange.
> Wilson is a professor and lacks an excuse for such misguided remarks.
> Nancy
>
> "Crawford’s one serious miscue here is his being too attuned to all this:
> He frequently lingers on questions of “gender” and Eliot’s view of Jews, as
> if looking over his shoulder at the assertions of scholars rather than
> keeping his eye trained on the details of the poet’s life. This gives *Young
> Eliot*, at times, the feel of a monograph of passing interest rather than
> an effort to present the finished, polished story of Eliot’s life. A few
> slips into jargon and the occasional direct references to the work of other
> scholars, which should have been reserved for the endnotes, contribute to
> this feeling."
> >>> Chanan Mittal 08/24/15 9:44 AM >>>
> Poet in Embryo
> Old Possum’s formative years.
> BY JAMES MATTHEW WILSON
> The Weekly Standard
> Aug 10, 2015
>
> http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/poet-embryo_1001527.html?nopager=1
>
> CR
>
>