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To me what matters is Eliot's life as a man of letters. What with
'Prufrock,' 'The Waste Land,' 'Tradition and the Individual Talent' et al.,
it started with a bang, not a whimper. The resonances still resound.

CR

On Friday, August 28, 2015, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> If you cannot pull up the review from the address below, you need only
> google "New York Times Young Eliot" and it comes up with no problem.
>
> Second, the paragraph below is how it ends.
>
> Third, it is absurd to agree or disagree with the concluding remark unless
> one reads the biography. It is extremely thorough and based on a lot of new
> research--such as tracking down accounts of Eliot's sailing far north by
> getting to the history archives in Jonesport, Maine (amazing). It is a
> brilliant book in my judgment, but it has to be read to be evaluated in any
> way.
> Nancy
>
>
> “The more perfect the artist, the more completely separate in him will be
> the man who suffers and the mind which creates,” Eliot argued. Crawford
> shrewdly notes how “Tom selected the verb ‘suffers,’ rather than, say,
> ‘loves,’ ‘exults’ or ‘experiences.’ ” Produced in the throes of great
> anguish, “The Waste Land” offers little hope within its borders. Eliot’s
> first half of life ended much as the world ends in his poem “The Hollow
> Men,” “not with a bang but a whimper.”
> >>> Chanan Mittal 08/28/15 11:15 AM >>>
> “the ways in which the ­passions and desires of the creator may be
> satisfied in the work of art are complex and devious" -- TSE
>
> “The more perfect the artist, the more completely separate in him will be
> the man who suffers and the mind which creates." -- TSE
>
> ---
>
> 'Young Eliot,' by Robert Crawford
> A review by David Yezzi
> The New York Times
> Aug. 21, 2015
>
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/23/books/review/young-eliot-by-robert-crawford.html?_r=0
>
> One may not concur with the concluding remark, though.
>
> CR
>