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Obscure references, yes. The element of mystery haunts both Eliot and
Holmes. It permeates The Waste Land, as well as Sweeney Agonistes.

CR

On Friday, July 3, 2015, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Holmes got Eliot Into the nitty gritty dirt of the dark side of London,
> that he learned about through the eyes of Baudelaire &  Laforgue,  about
> whom he was very explicit. It had temporal as well as spatial dimensions
> much more complex than ACD worked into the Holmes stories.
>
>    As I remember it,  Eliot was part of an informal Holmes club,  who were
> constantly trying to one up each other with obscure references in the
> different stories. The joy of it was that they weren't serious. Just good
> plain fun.
>
> P.
> On 3 Jul 2015 5:56 am, John Angell Grant <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> Fascinating....Eliot's modernist split between heart and mind, seen in his
> attitude towards detective stories.  Did Valerie ever weigh in on Eliot's
> aesthetic attitude towards entertainment literature...?
>
>
> ‘What did Conan Doyle mean to Eliot? He meant obviously enough for him to
> insert into a highly serious play, at its most serious point, lines almost
> verbatim, and yet he never dared to make a literary judgement on Conan
> Doyle. He always threatened, some day, to write a work which should provide
> an aesthetic for the detective story.’
>
> ‘Eliot himself, as we know, in his capacity as Managing Director of Faber
> and Faber, often wrote the blurbs for detective stories but never dared, it
> seems to me, to come out and state the nature of the problem we’re all
> aware of when it comes to dealing with literature of a particular class and
> literature of another class entirely. With the Sherlock Holmes stories,
> here was literature of one class, which Eliot was not prepared to submit to
> an aesthetic formulation.’
>
>
> <http://www.anthonyburgess.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/TSE-with-Valerie-Eliot.jpg>
>
> Burgess did not realise how much offence he had caused by making such a
> public criticism of Eliot in a lecture series which had been set up in his
> memory and funded by his estate. At the end of the lecture, Valerie Eliot
> left the auditorium in a state of anger, and she did not attend a
> celebration dinner that evening, at which she and Burgess were supposed to
> have been the guests of honour. Until the end of her long life, Mrs Eliot
> refused to allow permission for any further performances of Burgess’s
> setting of *The Waste Land*.
>
> On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 7:48 PM, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
> Anthony Burgess and TS Eliot
> http://www.anthonyburgess.org/mediablog/anthony-burgess-and-t-s-eliot
>
> Well, just in case you missed out on it.
>
> CR
>
>
>