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Hi David Hi Peter

Were all migrants here mate you heard a diversity of patois in my childhood. In 1966 we went to dollars and cents from pounds shillings and pence. In fact at school  I learnt to do the necessary arithmetic in the old money ( if I buy a shirt for two pounds ten shillings and sixpence and a tie for eleven shillings how much change will I get out of five pounds etc etc) the change to a North American currency style made life much easier but we lost contact with such lovely sayings as "not worth a two bob watch" and I have to go to spend a penny". We never took on those engaging English slang terms for money like monkey or pony however. Progress I guess.

Cheers

P


-----Original Message-----
From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of P
Sent: Tuesday, 28 July 2015 5:11 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Northern English phrase

Well if it comes from an oral background, & one's own background is literate, then the speaker could be right next door & one might never hear it.

My thank to Peter Dillane for the elucidation from down under.

The phrase 'It isn' t worth shit. ' comes to mind. That may be a North Aremican phrase. 

On 27 Jul 2015 9:42 am, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> You seem to be substantially accurate, Peter 
>
> Here is an example from, believe it or not, a tiny village just a few miles from where I live:- 
>
>
> https://mobile.twitter.com/danmatthews/status/550788059105857539 
>
>
> I've often heard 'sound as a pound' to describe someone favourably, but never this, which seems hyperbolically to spell out the converse. 
>
> I must have lived the last 60 years in a sheltered existence! 
>
> Good on you though, that the saying got identified 
>
>
> Sent https://mobile.twitter.com/danmatthews/status/550788059105857539from my iPad 
>
> > On 27 Jul 2015, at 16:43, Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> > 
> > Hey peter the expression is that a person is "nowt a pound and shit's tuppence" I think. I took it to mean relative values but it is clearly more complex than I superficially understood as if shit is tuppence you could still be doing alright although not the full quid. 
> > 
> > What's the Geordie hymn? Yes "fook him" ok I'll go quietly now 
> > 
> > Cheers Pete 
> > 
> > Sent from my iPhone 
> > 
> >> On 27 Jul 2015, at 6:14 pm, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> >> 
> >> reply.