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Hi  Clifford

The trouble with that video, though is that the images aren't at all
anything to do with the actual poem - a motley assemblage of clips of steam
trains, but otherwise nothing at all to do with Auden's poem and the
original Post Office Film Unit production.

I might be just a sad old former train spotter, but in this context, it
does matter!

regards

David

On 29 July 2015 at 23:15, C. Duffy <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Cheers to everyone from Canada (Mtl) . I am quite new to the list and I
> am very much enjoyin' this discussion about slang,patois,idiom, dialect,
> idiolect! Reading the post about W.H. Auden's night train, I thought of
> this video which I'd just seen: Voila, the link
>
>
> <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLHrPrk3PkU>
>  This is the Night Mail <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLHrPrk3PkU>
>
> There are several videos out  of the poem and this is the one I enjoy most.
>
> Clifford
>
> On Wed, Jul 29, 2015 at 2:53 AM, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Sorry -major typo - 'scene from a JB Priestley play.....'
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> > On 29 Jul 2015, at 07:49, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >
>> > Once upon a time in Britain they had mail trains, which some will
>> recall as the subject of WH Auden's 'Night Mail' poem. They typically
>> traversed the UK main lines, from London to Glasgow and Edinburgh; the
>> trains were made up of many red carriages; each train was really a big
>> mobile mail sorting facility - mountains of mailbags went onto the train at
>> its departure point; others were collected en route, many whilst the train
>> passed the collection point at full speed by an ingenious catcher built
>> into the train, which grabbed the line-side bags from a special gantry as
>> the train thundered past. Each mail train even had its own letter box,
>> where very very last minute mail for the direction of travel could be
>> posted late at night to ensure next day delivery.
>> >
>> > Anyhow, I once found myself as a schoolboy late at night on Carlisle
>> railway station, which is the last stop in England for trains on the west
>> coast main line to Glasgow, when the Glasgow -bound Night Mail drew in. I
>> was in the station buffet, which was also the station bar, serving draught
>> beer etc. I'd watched the buffet server curiously for the former ten
>> minutes as she had poured about fifty pints of beer from the pumps and
>> filled every spare space on the bar counter with the full tankards. All was
>> explained just after the Night Mail drew to a halt. It disgorged a crowd of
>> the sorting staff from ever carriage who en masse hurried into the buffet
>> and within half a minute or so the counter was no longer covered with beer
>> glasses. All the beer was very rapidly disappearing down the throats of all
>> the sorters, anxious to get a few pints rack down during the train's few
>> minute's stop in the Border City.
>> >
>> > The crowd of imbibers overflowed the buffet onto the platform by the
>> train. A Railway Porter came past them wheeling a big loaded trolley and
>> was clearly very familiar with many of the faces he saw, for cordial
>> greetings were exchanged. He greeted one older Sorter particularly warmly:
>> " 'Ello 'Arry, 'owyerdoin' !" in broad Carlisle accent (which is a curious
>> mongrel mixture of  northern English and Lowland Scots'
>> >
>> > Harry responded in equally broad London Cockney " Well, yunnow ow it
>> is, Fred: Up and Down.....Up and Down " followed by a wink and another puff
>> on his fag and another enormous  glug of beer from his tankard.
>> >
>> > Enacted on a dark and otherwise empty station platform wreathed in
>> steam and grime from the waiting big locomotive It was with hindsight all
>> like a masterful scene  from a JB  and it was a salutary early lesson for
>> young me about the rich and subtle comedy capable of being generated by
>> even the most ordinary and humble groups of workers.
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPad
>> >
>> >> On 28 Jul 2015, at 01:36, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> All kinds of interesting language are disappearing in the great
>> homogenisation.
>> >> My dad told me that when he was in London in WWI they used to kid the
>> drivers, when they would say something like "Next stop 'ampstead." Dad
>> would say "Didn't you drop something there?" The reply would be "That's
>> alright. I'll pick it up at Hoxford."
>> >> PM
>> >>
>> >>> On 27 Jul 2015 4:16 pm, Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> Hi David Hi Peter
>> >>>
>> >>> Were all migrants here mate you heard a diversity of patois in my
>> childhood. In 1966 we went to dollars and cents from pounds shillings and
>> pence. In fact at school  I learnt to do the necessary arithmetic in the
>> old money ( if I buy a shirt for two pounds ten shillings and sixpence and
>> a tie for eleven shillings how much change will I get out of five pounds
>> etc etc) the change to a North American currency style made life much
>> easier but we lost contact with such lovely sayings as "not worth a two bob
>> watch" and I have to go to spend a penny". We never took on those engaging
>> English slang terms for money like monkey or pony however. Progress I guess.
>> >>>
>> >>> Cheers
>> >>>
>> >>> P
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> -----Original Message-----
>> >>> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>> Behalf Of P
>> >>> Sent: Tuesday, 28 July 2015 5:11 AM
>> >>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> >>> Subject: Re: Northern English phrase
>> >>>
>> >>> Well if it comes from an oral background, & one's own background is
>> literate, then the speaker could be right next door & one might never hear
>> it.
>> >>>
>> >>> My thank to Peter Dillane for the elucidation from down under.
>> >>>
>> >>> The phrase 'It isn' t worth shit. ' comes to mind. That may be a
>> North Aremican phrase.
>> >>>
>> >>>> On 27 Jul 2015 9:42 am, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>>>
>> >>>> You seem to be substantially accurate, Peter
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Here is an example from, believe it or not, a tiny village just a
>> few miles from where I live:-
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> https://mobile.twitter.com/danmatthews/status/550788059105857539
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I've often heard 'sound as a pound' to describe someone favourably,
>> but never this, which seems hyperbolically to spell out the converse.
>> >>>>
>> >>>> I must have lived the last 60 years in a sheltered existence!
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Good on you though, that the saying got identified
>> >>>>
>> >>>>
>> >>>> Sent
>> https://mobile.twitter.com/danmatthews/status/550788059105857539from my
>> iPad
>> >>>>
>> >>>>> On 27 Jul 2015, at 16:43, Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Hey peter the expression is that a person is "nowt a pound and
>> shit's tuppence" I think. I took it to mean relative values but it is
>> clearly more complex than I superficially understood as if shit is tuppence
>> you could still be doing alright although not the full quid.
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> What's the Geordie hymn? Yes "fook him" ok I'll go quietly now
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Cheers Pete
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>> >>>>>
>> >>>>>> On 27 Jul 2015, at 6:14 pm, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> >>>>>>
>> >>>>>> reply.
>>
>
>