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On Thu, 12 Feb 2015 16:39:10 +0000, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>See too
>
>http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/09/26/new_englands_hidden_history/
>
>and (relating to Whitehaven, our local town)
>
>http://www.whitehavennews.co.uk/news/riddle-of-slave-buried-with-washington-s-grandmother-1.396098?referrerPath=news
>
>My wife’s former surname was Gale, so she invariably speculates about
>bygone family connections…….


David, thanks for sending the links.  The Boston Globe article at
   http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2010/09/26/new_englands_hidden_history/
almost ends with this:
   "In Concord," Lemire said, "the Minutemen clashed with the British at the Old North Bridge within sight of a man enslaved in the local minister’s house. ..."

A famous house of a Concord minister sitting by the bridge, known as the Old Manse, is a neighbor of my house, in a way. It is a few miles upstream. So the minister here must have been Ralph Waldo Emerson's grandfather, William Emerson.  I see that Emerson had two enslaved women although one had died by the time of the battle.  Both of these had married slaves of other men. One, Caesar Robbins, served in one of the local militia units during the Siege of Boston. He was eventually freed, built his own house and it was used by six generations. About two years ago the house was moved and restored and now sits at the parking lot for the Old North Bridge where it serves as an African-American history center.

http://drinkinggourdproject.org/blog/who-was-caesar-robbins-and-why-is-his-house-so-special/

Regards,
   Rick Parker