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And if Eliot and Yeats had already met, maybe twice at lunches, there could
be no truth in the story about their sitting side by side in a theatre in
Boston in 1932 and Yeats not recognizing him etc.

CR

On Thursday, December 11, 2014, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> So we have possibly taken into account THREE meetings between Eliot and
> Yeats which could be as follows:
>
> (1)  the first lunch meeting between Eliot and Yeats arranged by Ottoline
> Morrell in December 1922 (p. 363 of 'The Last Minstrels : Yeats and the
> Revival of the Bardic Arts' by Ronald Schuchard);
>
> (2) William Butler Yeats and T S Eliot at a luncheon given by Kenneth
> Ballard Murdock in 1925 as in the first photograph shared by me;
>
> (3) Then there is the meeting between them at Harvard where they met and
> were photographed (Plate 19) as mentioned in the footnote at p. 363 of
> Schuchard's book. There is no mention here of any lunch.
>
> CR
>
> On Thursday, December 11, 2014, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]
> <javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:
>
>> Apart from the footnote at p. 363 of the following link to which I drew
>> your attention, you might have read the whole page too which makes a
>> fascinating reading. It tells us about the first lunch meeting between
>> Eliot and Yeats arranged by Ottoline Morrell in December 1922. Here's the
>> link again:
>>
>>
>> http://books.google.com/books?id=4wxUNTepUVEC&pg=PA363&lpg=PA363&dq&f#v=onepage&q&f=false
>>
>> Regards,
>> CR
>>
>> On Thursday, December 11, 2014, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>>> Auden's poem is still in many ways the last word on Yeats. Yeats is
>>> among those few poets whose cadences are so perfect, so just,  that they
>>> become part of the language.
>>>
>>> By those great honey-colored
>>> Ramparts at your ear,
>>>
>>> Or
>>>
>>> What shall I do for pretty girls
>>> Now my old bawd is dead?
>>>
>>> Or
>>>
>>> Aeroplane and Zeppelin will come out.
>>> Pitch like King Billy bomb-balls in
>>> Until the town lie beaten flat.
>>>
>>> Or
>>>
>>> Somewhere among the clouds above;
>>>
>>> Or make even arrant nonsense excruciatingly beautiful:
>>>
>>> England may yet keep faith
>>>
>>> Carrol
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>>> Behalf Of Ken Armstrong
>>> Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2014 10:15 AM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: Re: Yeats and Eliot - a photograph
>>>
>>> Agree that Yeats is considered at least "one of the great poets of the
>>> time" but not that no one has ever suggested he was less than Eliot. Hughes
>>> in A Dancer to God certainly made that suggestion, and rather loud and
>>> clear at that. One prof I had suggested that Yeats was "an exceedingly good
>>> driver, but didn't seem to know where he was going."  I'm sure them's
>>> fighting words in some company, but they're not mine, just offered for the
>>> record. None of this gets to Peter's request for discussion of how Yeats'
>>> "The Second Coming" stacks up, rather than what he isn't. Does anyone know
>>> if there is a Yeats listserv, a counterpart to this one? I admit that I
>>> never felt particularly drawn to Yeats, though some of his poems and
>>> insights have entered the common language. I still think "cast a cold eye
>>> on life, on death" is a thrilling poetic endorsement of impersonality.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Ken A
>>>
>>> On 12/11/2014 8:33 AM, Nancy Gish wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>         I don't think anyone has ever questioned the standing of Yeats
>>> as one of
>>>         the great poets of the time or as in any way less than Eliot.
>>> There is
>>>         no "was."
>>>         Nancy
>>>
>>>
>>>                                 P  12/11/14 5:41 AM >>>
>>>
>>>         It's important to keep in mind,  in spite these personality
>>> attitudes,
>>>         that Yeats was considered a giant of a poet in his own right.
>>> Cf.
>>>         Auden's In Memoriam W. B. Yeats: 'The day of his death was a
>>> dark, cold
>>>         day'....'Mad Ireland hurt you into poetry' &c. He was a major
>>> influence
>>>         and this list could do worse than give him some attention. Cf
>>> The Second
>>>         Coming. How does it stand up against Eliot & Pound?
>>>         Peter
>>>
>>>         James Loucks <[log in to unmask]>
>>> <mailto:[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>                 Thanks, Rick, for your post. In light of their
>>> "incompatibility" it's
>>>
>>>         interesting to learn that TSE gave the initial Yeats Memorial
>>> Lecture in
>>>         1940. It's also important to recollect that it was Pound who
>>> went about
>>>         steering WBY toward modernism and away from the "Celtic
>>> phantasmagoria"
>>>         of the 1890s, just a few years before he (Pound) went to work on
>>> the
>>>         young poet just down from Merton. -- All best,  Jim
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>                 On Wednesday, December 10, 2014 7:49 PM, Rickard A.
>>> Parker  wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>                 On Sat, 6 Dec 2014 23:53:23 -0500, James Loucks  wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>                         This would have been in autumn 1932, when TSE
>>> sailed to the US to
>>>
>>>         deliver the Norton Lectures (1932-33); that same year Yeats
>>> visited the
>>>         US to be present at the opening of one of his plays in New York.
>>> It was
>>>         an uneasy meeting, over a formal dinner (I think it might have
>>> been at
>>>         Wellesley, but have to check on that). WBY sat next to TSE but
>>> was
>>>         engaged in conversation with a young woman on the side away from
>>> TSE. He
>>>         then turned to TSE and said that he and the lady had been
>>> discussing the
>>>         poetry of TSE, and asked what TSE thought about the subject. TSE
>>> turned
>>>         his place card to WBY to identify himself.  --  best,  --  Jim
>>> Loucks
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>                 I love this story Jim and I had to find more about it. I
>>> found a
>>>
>>>         secondary source for the WBY/TSE anedote in
>>>
>>>
>>>                 T. S. Eliot: Poetry, Plays and Prose
>>>                 By Sunil Kumar Sarker
>>>                 Page 9
>>>
>>>
>>> https://books.google.com/books?id=XRM9C5VWH-AC&pg=PA9&dq=%22Eliot%20and%20his%20contemporary%20W.B.%20Yeats%22#v=onepage&q=%22Eliot%20and%20his%20contemporary%20W.B.%20Yeats%22&f=false
>>>
>>>                 Eliot and his contemporary W.B. Yeats (1865-1939)
>>> maintained lukewarm
>>>
>>>         relation between them. Richard Ellmann described this relation
>>> as "long,
>>>         languid incompatibility." Ellmann wrote: "Among their various
>>> mild
>>>         collisions none was more defined than the dinner at Wellesley
>>> College
>>>         when Yeats, seated next to Eliot but oblivious of him, conversed
>>> with
>>>         the guest on the other side until late in the meal. He then
>>> turned and
>>>         said, 'My friend here and I have been discussing the defects of
>>> T.S.
>>>         Eliot's poetry. What do you think of that poetry?' "Eliot held
>>> up his
>>>         place card to excuse himself from the jury" (Sutherland, 442).
>>> In spite
>>>         of this cold relationship between the two great poets, we must
>>> say that
>>>         Eliot was by any standard congenial, affable and meek.
>>>
>>>
>>>                 Regards,
>>>                  Rick Parker
>>>
>>>                 P.S. To keep the story and picture together here is the
>>> link that C.R.
>>>
>>>         sent us:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673612605005/images?imageId=fx1
>>> ┬žionType=lightBlue&hasDownloadImagesLink=false
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>