Print

Print


Odd, us it not, how the academy places such emphasis upon the accomplishments of ancient civilizations (e.g. Grecian thought and letters) when a quick look at the surface reveals a bunch of murderous tribes.  I suppose we do not want the schoolchildren to turn cynical too early as they journey down the hallowed hallways and therefore infuse their studies with the ideals of the past.  Not suggesting Modernism (or worse Post-Modernism) has it right; just that the pendulum has swung since 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 2, 2014, at 6:08 PM, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Ancient Greek democracy was only for a few: there were no free women or slaves (with a very few intellectual women as exceptions).
> Nancy
> 
> >>> Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> 12/2/2014 5:33 PM >>>
> And Eliot (or perhaps Tiresias) _almost_ grasped this:
> 
> I have heard the key
> Turn in the door once and turn once only
> We think of the key, each in his prison
> Thinking of the key, each confirms a prison
> Only at nightfall, aetherial rumour
> Revive for a moment a broken Coriolanus
> 
> Carrol
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf
> Of Carrol Cox
> Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2014 4:16 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: The Bulk -- oops
> 
> :-;
> 
> One of the greatest discoveries of ancient Athens (or at least of the
> peasants & artisans) has been pretty well hidden: the discovery that freedom
> can only be attained and enjoyed collectively.
> 
> Carrol
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf
> Of Ken Armstrong
> Sent: Monday, December 01, 2014 11:29 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: The Bulk -- oops
> 
> Sorry folks, that last post was an error, meant to go to another recipient.
> And I can't vouch for it one way or the other. Apologies....
> Ken A