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The language is Eliot's contribution; he was trying to create a poetry that reflected the language of ordinary speech,  such that a person would say,  I could write like that. The naturalistic/realistic stage production is Brown's patterned after Ibsen's work. Eliot was trying for something new; Brown was resorting to the old. 
Hence the unnecessary tension that dragged the plays down.  A new style of production is needed that complements the language rather than upstanding it. 
Peter

"Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On Mon, 15 Sep 2014 05:58:25 +0000, Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>Unfortunately the E. Martin Browne effect levelled it all down to homogenized Ibsen, an essay on wheels.
>
>Peter, please elaborate. This part "levelled it all down to homogenized Ibsen, an essay on wheels" is a bit above me but I think I know what you mean but I'm more interested in the Browne part. Do you think it was his influence that led to unnatural language, and if so, how and why?
>
>Regards,
>   Rick Parker