Print

Print


Significantly, 

"April is the cruellest month, breeding
 Lilacs out of the dead land" 

has its counterpart in 'Gerontion,' meant to preface The Waste Land.

In the juvescence of the year
Came Christ the tiger

In depraved May, dogwood and chestnut, flowering judas,
To be eaten, to be divided, to be drunk
Among whispers; 

The connection with Easter in the opening lines of TWL are, as such, is not without basis.

CR 

On Sunday, April 13, 2014, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
In poetry you have to have a basis in the poem for what you decipher.  If there are resonances back and forth in the poem for what you see, some at least will see it too. What the Thunder Says opens with the Passion of Christ, as well as his subsequent encounter with his disciples on the road to Emmaus. Eliot points to it in his notes. It is plausible therefore the poem opens on a note of agony vis-a-vis the modern wastelanders' apathy to the spiritual significance of April/Easter.

CR

On Sunday, April 13, 2014, Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]');" target="_blank">[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I had a mate who was an engineer. He was pretty concrete in his thinking except he felt that Chaucer's Prioress referring to the virgin as the "white lylye flour" was making imaginative connection with cooking flour.  He was cruelly rebuffed by one of our number  with "are you suggesting that the prioress thinks the virgin is a cake?"
I suppose you can take what you want from anything that's written but society can be cruel I fear.

Cheers pete


On 4/14/2014 8:39 AM, Chanan Mittal wrote:
That's how poetry should be. 
I only caught one of the resonances.
There could be many more to it.
Cheers,
CR

On Sunday, April 13, 2014, Rickard A. Parker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
On Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:54:40 -0400, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>The immediate specific justification of a Christian context to the opening
>passage is the passage which immediately follows, saturated with Christian
>allusions to Ezekiel et al.

Sorry, but despite the allusions my reading of that section doesn't contain
religion.

Regards,
   Rick Parker