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:-) That was the young KM, before he had really hit his stride -- but it's still worth pondering.

And, incidentally, Liberation Theology is again in good odor at the Vatican. The world is unpredictable. It is not only that, as Mao said, "Marxists have no crystal balls"; NO ONE has a crystal ball. The great power of imaginative literature is the room it creates for surprise & contingency. The last lines of the Iliad, of PL, of PR, & of the Cantos (as well as of TWL) open on to an utterly open world.

And so the Trojans buried Hektor breaker of horses.

		. . .hee unobserv'd
Home to his Mothers house private return'd.           

These lines for the ultimate CANTO
         whatever I may write in the interim.

They hand in hand with wandring steps and slow,
Through Eden took thir solitarie way.

Carrol

-----Original Message-----
From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Peter Dillane
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 6:52 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: The opening lines of 'The Waste Land' via-a-vis Easter

The sigh of the oppressed, the heart in a heartless world... 

Cheers Pete

-----Original Message-----
From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Peter Montgomery
Sent: Tuesday, 15 April 2014 8:57 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: The opening lines of 'The Waste Land' via-a-vis Easter

Er.... What's religion?
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ken Armstrong" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 3:41 PM
Subject: Re: The opening lines of 'The Waste Land' via-a-vis Easter


> On Sun, 13 Apr 2014 11:54:40 -0400, Chanan Mittal <[log in to unmask]> 
> wrote:
>>> The immediate specific justification of a Christian context to the 
>>> opening
>>> passage is the passage which immediately follows, saturated with 
>>> Christian
>>> allusions to Ezekiel et al.
>> Sorry, but despite the allusions my reading of that section doesn't 
>> contain
>> religion.
>>
>> Regards,
>>     Rick Parker
>
>      Rickard,
>
>    Maybe you could define "contain"? Tom Jefferson read the Bible without 
> religion by the exigency of excising the religious terminology. Effective 
> for him perhaps, but no one of any persuasion could reasonably call the 
> end result "The Bible." I assume you're not editing out the parts of TWL 
> that have religious weight and which its author, presumably, put in for 
> that reason. Or is this related to that anticipated retirement project you 
> mentioned earlier?
>
>     For my part, I've decided to write a bar song -- or maybe it's just a 
> retirement song -- about the TWL to the tune of The Bowery. So far, I've 
> got the refrain down pat.
>
>    Thanks,
>    Ken A
>
> ---
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