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On Thu, 10 Apr 2014 15:38:00 -0500, Rickard A. Parker
<[log in to unmask]> wrote (under the subject "Previously at the Guardian"):

>Also along the same lines is another article that brings up Eliot.  Before
>sending you that URL I will post a URL to a picture in which Eliot appears
>with others mentioned in the article. http://tinyurl.com/k3ywycn

The URL
   http://tinyurl.com/k3ywycn
brings you to
  
http://www.gq.com/images/news-and-politics/2014/04/woody-allen/woody-allen-judge-movie-film-director-actor-talent-02.jpg
and that is part of a GQ article that brings up the topic "How can you love
the work when you hate the man?" It's based on news/allegations  about Woody
Allen but Eliot appears in the second sentence and elsewhere.



http://www.gq.com/entertainment/celebrities/201404/woody-allen-scandal-controversies

Hate the Sinner and the Sin (But Judge the Damn Movie Yourself)

An artist creates his own moral universe, a Woody Allen character once
said--but what happens when the artist (or athlete, or politician, or
thinker) has done horrible things? Is their work then horrible, too? Andrew
Corsello grapples with Woody and all of our most talented jerks

By Andrew Corsello
April 2014 

First paragraph is:

What are we to do with all these magnifıcent creeps? An ancient question,
ever refreshed, since the world never stops popping them out: Thomas
Jefferson, T. S. Eliot, Ty Cobb, Roman Polanski, O. J. Simpson, Michael
Vick, Lance Armstrong, Woody Allen, Heisman winner/possible rapist Jameis
Winston… Though they're always with us, the question of if and how we allow
them into our lives flows and ebbs. Lately, like some bum septic tank, it's
been erupting.

Regards,
   Rick Parker