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I dare not confute you, Carrol.
Regards,
cr

On Thursday, April 24, 2014, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> They do scare you, cr, don't they. You shiver in fear and try to "put them
> in their place."
>
> Carrol
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]<javascript:;>]
> On Behalf Of Chanan Mittal
> Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:43 AM
> To: [log in to unmask] <javascript:;>
> Subject: Re: It's Roz Kaveney again
>
> And, if there is a certain "type" of woman, then there is a certain "type"
> of man.
>
>
> That 's to the point. And that is the point.
>
>
> CR
>
> On Wednesday, April 23, 2014, Kate Nichols <[log in to unmask]<javascript:;>>
> wrote:
>
>
>         More to the point, how could an intelligent man not acknowledge,
> or worse, realize the humanity of women.  And, if there is a certain "type"
> of woman, then there is a certain "type" of man.  I cannot help but think
> of Stevens, also living in an unhappy marriage, but the women in his works
> are real and often may be turned to for truth or enlightenment, i.e., She
> sang beyond the genius of the sea . . .
>
>
>         On Wed, Apr 23, 2014 at 3:03 PM, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]<javascript:;><javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','
> [log in to unmask] <javascript:;>');> > wrote:
>
>
>                 Nancy Gish: "It's hardly news, as it is written about in
> books and articles for--oh--maybe 40 years or more."
>
>                 My point, of course, is both specific to Eliot and a more
> general historical point. That's been written about for rather more than a
> century. See the reply of Mrs. Croft to Wentworth's idiocy about not
> wanting women on his ship! But also see the poignant final sentences of the
> fourth volume of Parade's End.
>
>                 And who can miss the question Prufrock dare not ask. I've
> just been listening to a reading of Paradise Regained:
>
>                 Belial the dissolutest Spirit that fell,
>                 The sensuallest, and after Asmodai
>                 The fleshliest Incubus, and thus advis'd.
>
>                     Set women in his eye and in his walk,
>                 Among daughters of men the fairest found;
>                 Many are in each Region passing fair
>                 As the noon Sky; more like to Goddesses
>                 Then Mortal Creatures, graceful and discreet,
>                 Expert in amorous Arts, enchanting tongues
>                 Perswasive, Virgin majesty with mild
>                 And sweet allay'd, yet terrible to approach. . . .
>                         PR II. 151-61
>
>                 TERRIBLE: Terrifying. Prfrcock's thoughts precisely!
>
>                 Also Eliot's???
>
>                 Carrol
>
>