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Thanks Ken, Carroll and Nancy:  but Ken I am not sure what you mean by philosophical anthropology.

The intellectual influence of the early anthropologists was considerable.  Often times they were  missionaries or curious travelers reporting on their experiences but academic ethnology was beginning.  James Frazer (Golden Baugh) and Lewis H. Morgan (Ancient Society) were two of the early ethnologists

Lewis H Morgan who studied the Iroquois Confederation, wrote,  "League of the Iroquois" in 1851 and probably the more influential "Ancient Society" in 1877.  On page v-vi of "Ancient Society" he gives his famous Savagery to Barbarism to civilization sequence.   

The point is that to the academic community of the turn of the century those terms, savagery and barbarism, were part of the academic taxonomy of societies.   They had the weight universally accepted definitions within the intellectual community.  Both Marx and Engel read and were influenced by "Ancient Society" and its depiction of an evolutionary sequence of society.

We know that TSE was familiar with "Golden Baugh" and he is probably pointing to Frazer with his note about anthropologists.  But, I would be surprised if "Ancient Society" was not also read at Harvard.

Were Frazer and Weston his only exposure to the study of myth?  As I recall "Ancient Society" does not deal with myth at all. 
 
Richard Seddon
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On Oct 7, 2013, at 10:41 AM, Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 10/7/2013 12:19 PM, Carrol Cox wrote:
> 
> It's been 50 years since I read Kenner's book on Eliot, but wouldn't that be a good source for Eliot's relations to Bradley?>
> 
> It might be -- I also read it a long time ago --  but Kenner had not read the dissertation when he wrote on it.
> 
> Ken A
>