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I've got nothing important to say here but I did read something tonight
about pre-revolutionary war Boston newspaper wars and the the Boston Globe
was just bought by John Henry, one of the owners of the Boston Red Sox (Go
Sox!) so I thought that I would refind something I read sometime back
dealing with a "gentleman from 'the Transcript'".


http://www.economicprincipals.com/issues/2007.09.16/265.html

economicprincipals.com
an independent weekly
David Warsh, Proprietor
September 16, 2007
The Second Century of the Boston Evening Transcript

...

In 1930 the Boston Evening Transcript celebrated the centennial of its
founding with a little book of excerpts from birthday tributes from
newspapers all around the country. All tended to support the view that among
American newspapers, the Transcript was unique: old-fashioned,
individualistic, intellectually, eager to know and to educate. “The
Transcript is the country’s thought of Boston. Its devotion to literature,
science, art, music, Harvard, the wool market, genealogy and a half dozen
other peculiarly Boston institutions, gives the Transcript a character all
its own” (Minneapolis Journal). “Under the ownership of one thrifty family,
it has managed to preserve a tone and temper of its own” (The New York
Times). “Many a cherished tradition is melting down in the fires of modern
life but the excellence of the Transcript stands up through the flame” (The
Boston Globe). “The Saturday Evening Transcript is more than a newspaper. It
combines the services of a newspaper and a magazine….perhaps no paper is
more often quoted in other newspapers than is the Transcript (Greenfield,
Mass. Gazette and Courier).  And, of course, there was the cherished
chestnut “which concerns the butler who announced the arrival of the
representatives of the press by the phrase, ‘Two persons from the papers,
madame, and a gentleman from ‘the Transcript”’ (The New York Herald).

Twelve years later, the newspaper was out of business.

Why?  After the death in 1934 of editor George Mandell, last of the founding
family, the paper collapsed “almost like the one-hoss shay,” according to
Louis Lyons, longtime Nieman Foundation curator. A standard boast had been
that among its readers were “the 50,000 best minds in Boston,” but
circulation probably peaked at 30,000 in 1935 — not enough to sustain it in
the lean times of the Great Depression. A brief resurrection after 1938
under a textile magnate who added comics didn’t help. Pretty soon all that
most people remembered of the Transcript was the T.S. Eliot poem of that name:

    The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript
    Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.
    When evening quickens faintly in the street,
    Wakening the appetites of life in some
    And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript,
    I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning
    Wearily, as one would turn to nod good-bye to Rochefoucauld,
    If the street were time and he at the end of the street,
    And I say, “Cousin Harriet, here is the Boston Evening Transcript.”

...