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Yes granted Nancy and the danger was great I understand thinking of the catastrophe for Alan Turing in the late fifties .  Pete


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On 27/08/2013, at 8:42 PM, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Given the impact on any gay person's life in the early 20th century, I cannot agree. It would matter very much if one were publicly represented as gay: think Djuna Barnes or, more disturbingly, Oscar Wilde. So portraying gay situations was itself an issue, and it is as serious a discussion as any other.
> Cheers,
> Nancy
> 
> 
> 
>>>> David Boyd  08/26/13 9:59 PM >>>
> I happen presently to be concluding a critical biography of a contemporary
> Faber poet, and I haven't as yet and probably never will be able
> meaningfully to place his sexuality in particular upon any
> currently-meaningful spectrum of same.
> 
> Polarised thinking about such matters I just instinctively feel is
> unhelpful, both as regards my own subject and Eliot himself.
> 
> 
> On 26 August 2013 19:44, Nancy Gish  wrote:
> 
>> We don't absolutely "know" it any more than we do any other reference. But
>> the reference was said to be commonly known. I will have to look up the
>> sources of the claim when I get back to the States in September. But it has
>> been stated as a fact by many sources.
>> 
>> 
>> On the other hand, we don't "know" which of the many meanings might be
>> best attached to Tiresias, for example. So I'll look it up when I can.
>> Cheers,
>> Nancy
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>>>> Peter Dillane  08/26/13 11:18 AM >>>
>> Hi Nancy and Carrol,
>> 
>> How do we know that Mr Eugenides is asking a male out?
>> 
>> He is a study in libidinous importunity ( unshaven and his pocket full of
>> currants to me figures a kind of hedonistic indifference to polite
>> convention or perhaps a foreigner inappropriateness) but I cant see he has
>> to be homosexual.