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On 8/3/2013 5:18 PM, P wrote:
> The preconversion folk say little about his conversion as part of his quest; for them it is a betrayal. The post conversion folk tend to look only at the message(quest); the medium is beside the point.

      Doing a search for an Eliot title today on our university 
library's web pages, I mistakenly put my terms into one of those third 
party data bases that goes out and searches all manner of books and 
journals instead of just the library's own holdings and electronic 
subscriptions. The results on the first page showed some interesting 
titles and I started going through them until I realized that there were 
well over 2,000 listed. When I narrowed the search to the last 20 years, 
there were still over 1400 books and articles listed. The results 
included over 700 academic journals, 249 books and 149 magazines. That's 
a lot of ink spilled by folk interested in Eliot and his literary 
criticism, the main terms of my search. I wonder for how many of them 
Eliot's conversion is a significant issue. Even on the list here I get 
the idea that most of us have some kind of opinion, but that the event 
itself isn't taken as the high definition issue that it was for his 
contemporaries. I don't mean that it doesn't matter, but only that it 
often seems almost a side issue, taken for granted, particularly since 
most of the attention is on TWL and the poems that preceded it.

    I'm not presenting an argument, but just wondering, with such a wide 
and populous professional readership, what are the actual demarcations 
of interest within such a broad audience. I don't know the membership 
numbers of the Eliot society, but the return from that search makes me 
think it is only a small percentage of the folk paying attention to 
Eliot professionally.

  Ken A

  Ken A