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They say that drinking lots of cranberry juice can help considerably re the
thrush  :-)


On 28 July 2013 14:06, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> reverting to the thrush
>
> What the Thrush Said to T. S. Eliot
> By Al Benthall
> English Studies, Volume 94, Issue 5, 2013,
> pages 519-534
>
> Abstract
>
> // Although birds and birdsongs have inspired myriad poems for millennia,
> the thrush has generated a special fascination for English and American
> poets over the last two centuries. This little-known fact is borne out by a
> cabal of well-known poets who have written poems in pursuit of the elusive
> thrush and its ethereal song. In most of these poems, the thrush seems to
> know something the speaker doesn't, and its song taunts the speaker and
> reader alike with the possibility of hidden meaning beyond the reach of
> words. Many examples could be adduced, such as Thomas Hardy's “The Darkling
> Thrush,” Siegfried Sassoon's “Thrushes”, William Carlos Williams's “To a
> Wood Thrush”, Robert Frost's “Come In” and others. This fascination did not
> escape T. S. Eliot, and he dramatically incorporates thrush songs into his
> two greatest poems, The Waste Land and Four Quartets. These allusions
> locate Eliot in a conversation between his poetic predecessors and
> successors, which I would argue has a bearing on both of these poems. //
>
>
> http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0013838X.2013.795733#.UfUUL9I3sqM
>
> CR
>
>