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Hi Nancy,

if asked where I put myself I think it would be at the deontology end of the spectrum not the utilitarian.

And I know even little murders matter. But I can't see this one as a hanging offence.

I think we would have to disagree on this one.  Sophisticated people beyond middle age should have learnt from experience that a friend in the throes of eros does bastardry.  And I think this is built into the society. We will accept completely that a person - say a Judge- is of high probity without pausing over their sometimes equally public serial adultery with all its attendant lies. 

A surprisingly common  clinical problem I encounter is the  person who has an adulterous partner but who has no moral framework to see the event. That is they are suffering dreadfully but they can't identify what exactly the other person has done wrong. 

I don't think what is entails anything but I am prepared to be wrong about that one.

Pete


On 23/02/2013, at 8:44 AM, Nancy Gish wrote:

Dear Peter,
 
I agree on the lack of connection between "faith" and good behavior; clearly we see no connection in a disturbing number of cases, and right now in the world it seems especially bad.
 
My disagreement is with treating it as somehow ok because it is not unusual, is even common. I'm not at all naive about how many people behave, nor have I lived without receiving it. But it is never ok or something to dismiss cavalierly.
 
"Is" does not entail "ought" or even "ok."
Cheers,
Nancy

>>> Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]>02/22/13 4:23 PM >>>
Hi Nancy, Hi Ken,

I don't think it's fine but I think the 9th circle doesn't want for numbers. I don't have a reliable guide to modal trends in the behaviour of those of faith but right now they aint looking so good worldwide. And my professional experience is that the call to faith does not appear to change behaviour so much from the general run of persons. I have had quite a few clergy and their spouses as customers in the aftermath of this little human tragedy. Not sure a scientific approach would help but I expect it might require a double blind study. 
Be good.

Pete.
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