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http://www.dw.de/pope-benedict-xvi-we-have-a-positive-idea-to-offer/a-2129951

"Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On Mon, 11 Feb 2013 06:56:18 -0800, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>"The most fruitful kind of interest in the Middle Ages is not the interest
>in a remote or obscure 'period,' but the interest which finds lessons for
>the present time from particular traditions of art, of philosophy and
>theology, or of social organization." -- TS Eliot
>
>http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-02-11/the-last-time-a-pope-resigned-dante-put-him-in-hell
>   The Last Time a Pope Resigned, Dante Put Him in Hell
>   By Peter Coy on February 11, 2013 
>
>   It’s difficult to overstate the importance of Pope Benedict XVI’s
>decision to resign
>   the papacy for health reasons. The last time a pope resigned voluntarily
>was 1294.
>   The great poet Dante Alighieri was so angry about it that he put the
>abdicating pope,
>   Celestine V, into the antechamber of his Inferno. In the more than seven
>centuries
>   since, no pope has taken the name Celestine.
>
>
>Wikipedia:
>   A persistent tradition identifies Celestine V as the nameless figure
>   Dante Alighieri sees among those in the antechamber of Hell, in the
>   enigmatic verses:
>       I saw and recognized the shade of him
>       Who by his cowardice made the great refusal.
>       —Inferno III, 59–60
>
>
>http://wdtprs.com/blog/2012/05/a-pope-in-hell-the-curious-case-of-pope-st-peter-celestine-v/
>   A Pope in hell? The curious case of Pope St. Peter Celestine V
>   Posted on 19 May 2012 by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf 
>
>   Dante, in his Divine Comedy, in Inferno 3, places in hell someone whom we
>think may be
>   Peter Celestine V.  Dante calls him “the shade of him who in his
>cowardice made the great
>   refusal”.  ”The great refusal” being the rejection of the highest office
>to which one
>   might ascend in this world, with all the duties and responsibilities and
>implications
>   for the bonds of society that that office carries.  Remember that the
>Divine Comedy is
>   about, among other things, the interrelationship of the secular and the
>sacred.  Dante
>   was writing political theory in the Divine Comedy.  His Hell is
>constructed to reflect
>   the ways in which people harm no just themselves, but also the bonds of
>society.  Dante
>   would have hated Peter Celestine’s abdication also because he opened the
>way for Dante’s
>   great enemy Boniface VIII, whom he detested.