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The lines are hardly worthy of including even in _The Stuffed Owl_ (an
anthology of bad verse). It reminds one of The Sweet Singer of Michigan. Bad
lines from Dryden or Wordsworth at least show a distant acquaintance with
the cadences of English.

Carrol

> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Nancy Gish
> Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 1:47 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: 'Departure and Arrival' by TS Eliot ???
> 
> This is what is on www.blurtit., whoever or whatever that is. It is
difficult to
> imagine anything less accurate or more cliched and silly. No one is listed
as
> having established the authorship or having checked that it is only the
first
> stanza and then what Ken calls "stripling graduation poem." It is
extremely
> unhelpful to spread this stuff unless one can establish that Eliot
actually
> wrote all the rest of that extremely adolescent poem and can show where it
> appears in any of his writing.
> 
> This is why just assuming anything on the web is information, let alone
> understanding, can be accepted.
> 
> Can anyone find the rest? One can only hope not.
> Nancy
> 
> 
> "Departure and Arrival" is one of the Eliot's early poems. It is a
combination
> of idealism and optimism. It inspires us to accept the most difficult
challenges
> of life. Eliot urges us to set high goals before us and then strive
fearlessly to
> achieve them. We must plan to reach our destination. Departure is a must
> for a final arrival. The struggle to make this world a better place
according to
> our vision is a self-rewarding virtue. To work for the welfare of others
is a
> noble but difficult mission.
> 
> 
> >>> Chokh Raj 02/18/13 9:36 AM >>>
> 
> You'll kindly excuse me but I must share this link as well:
> 
> 
> http://www.blurtit.com/q979418.html
> 
> 
> 
> CR
> 
> ________________________________
> 
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
> 
> BTW,
> 
> Here're some poetic pages on DEPARTURES that set out with the
> opening stanza of the poem ascribed to Eliot.
> 
> http://www.gilesswayne.com/images/home/departures-booklet.pdf
> 
> CR
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> 
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Mon, Feb 18, 2013 1:50:17 PM:
> 
> 
> Here's a poem said to be written by Eliot titled 'Departure and Arrival'.
> I'm copying it out from the following link:
> http://www.paklinks.com/gs/images-central/66393-for-all-my-friends-out-
> there.html
> 
> There are other links at Google that mention this poem but don't provide
the
> text.
> Could someone guide me to an authentic source where I could find this
> poem?
> 
> Departure and Arrival
> T.S. Eliot
> 
> Standing upon the shores of all we know
> We linger for a moment doubtfully,
> Then with a song upon our lips, sail we
> Across the harbor bar -- no chart to show
> No light to warn of rocks which lie below,
> But let us put forth courageously.
> 
> Although the path be tortuous and slow,
> Although it bristles with a thousand fears,
> To hopeful eye of youth it still appears
> A lane by which the rose and hawthorn grow
> We hope it may be, would that we might know
> Would we might look into the future years.
> 
> Great duties call--the twentieth century
> More grandly dowered than those which came before,
> Summons -- who knows what time may hold in store,
> Or what great deed the distant years may see,
> What conquest over pain and misery,
> What heroes greater than were ever of yore.
> 
> But if this century is to be more great
> Than those before, her sons must make her so
> And we are of her sons, and we must go
> With eager hearts to help mould well her fate,
> And see that she shall gain such proud estate
> And shall on future centuries bestow.
> 
> A legacy of benefits -- may we
> In future years be found with those who try
> To labour for the good until they die,
> And ask no other question than to know
> That they have helped the cause of victory,
> That with their aid the flag is raised so high.
> 
> Sometime in distant years when we are grown
> Gray-haired and old, whatever be our lot,
> We shall desire to see again the spot
> Which, whatever we have been or done
> Or to what distant lands we may have gone,
> Through all the years will never have been forgot.
> 
> -----
> 
> CR
>