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And what do you make of:
"Nobody's up here?"

I always get the impression they're making ready for Guy Fawkes day.
P. M.

Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Being introduced  before your entrance  then not actually having much to say keeps you ominous I think.  That wonderment Doris has that Sam is the Knave of Hearts is quite disturbing. After the earlier riffing she and Dusty do on Sam being a nice boy and so on.   Puts you on edge for a predator. Then that nice play on "Loot" which is his rank no - except he would be phoenetically a  "leftenant" in Britain so Loot gets a focus and  what will he loot ? But he does the Ringmaster introductions and then there is silence as he becomes part of the chorus. Maybe its as well we dont find out where the plot goes.
>
> 
>
>Pete
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>
>From: P 
>
>To: [log in to unmask] 
>
>Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 3:52 PM
>
>Subject: Re: Sweeney Agonistes: Eliot’s raw underbelly
>
>
>The flat accent could make him stand out, perhaps in an ominous way. Eliot was always sensitive to such details.
>P. M.
>
>Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>Sam’s interesting isn’t he. Veteran of a celebrated single minded force. I suppose the CEF would have been pin up boys with Ypres still in the mind. I think anyone who brings an aphoristic pair like K and K around to see some girls has more than one arrow in his quiver.
>
>Pete
>
>From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of P
>Sent: Monday, 21 January 2013 4:32 PM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: Sweeney Agonistes: Eliot’s raw underbelly
>
>I tend to trend your way Pete, but surely there are them's as cain't or won't. And what's your take on the Canadian? ;->
>Pierre
>
>Peter Dillane <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>Hey CR,
>
>this is not at all the way I see Sweeney A.  I only have small observations to make but  to the extent that Lehmann sees it in a particular kind of place - a course (sic) pub - and that the bamboo tree business is supposed to be a referential nod to any worldly idyll viz Gauguin's world. Well I can't see it.  I know that the boys arrive and Doris calls down to them in the street but the notion that the play can be imagined in a setting is at odds with the irreal sense of space and time.   And the Bamboo tree is more a link to the  music hall than the actual South Seas. ( I think of Judy Garland in Meet me in St Louis doing the song by the way)
>
>Cheers Pete.
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>
>From: Chokh Raj 
>
>To: [log in to unmask] 
>
>Sent: Monday, January 21, 2013 3:31 PM
>
>Subject: Re: Sweeney Agonistes: Eliot’s raw underbelly
>
>Sweeney Agonistes: Eliot’s raw underbelly
>
>Is Poetry Fiction?
>
> by
>
>Gary Lehmann
>
>http://www.poetrykit.org/pkmag/pkmag11/029.htm
>
>CR
>