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Paul's descriptiveness tends to support Peter's original thought in this 
thread. Not too surprising, I suppose.

   Ken A

On 1/9/2013 6:51 PM, Nancy Gish wrote:
> Paul was being descriptive: doing what editors do. Perhaps you might 
> like to read the book as a whole and see the varied views, including mine.
> N
>
> >>> Chokh Raj 01/09/13 6:38 PM >>>
> this vis-a-vis Peter Montgomery's remark
>
> "Dante's influence on European literature was enhanced greatly by T. 
> S. Eliot, who in a sense renovated Dante for modern literature. ...
>
> It is fitting that the last word in this volume should fall to the 
> writer who brought the topic of T. S. Eliot and Dante to coalescence 
> over twenty years ago in T. S. Eliot and Dante (1989). One of the most 
> compelling responses to the Eliot-inspired embrace of Dante by 
> twentieth-century writers has come recently from the pen of American 
> writer Wendell Berry. The vital European tradition appears to form the 
> core of Berry's contemporary American literary project. On receiving 
> the T. S. Eliot Award for Creative Writing in 1994, Berry paid tribute 
> to Eliot's "pilgrimage of works" from "The Love Song of J. Alfred 
> Prufrock" to The Elder Statesman. Eliot, according to Berry, presented 
> "dismembered" personalities who move out of the shadows of the 
> wasteland and into the light of what Berry calls "a love far greater… 
> than their own." Manganiello argues that Berry's own fragmented 
> figures in novels such as Remembering (1988) and Jayber Crow (2000) 
> follow a similar trajectory to become transfigured pilgrims in a 
> divine comedy. The exchanges of love and compassion that restore 
> fractured family relationships in Eliot's The Elder Statesman are 
> echoed in Berry's work, which Manganiello argues is founded on 
> Dantesque themes that reaffirm the importance of "Europe's Epic" and 
> therefore an "idea of Europe" propounded by Eliot."
>
> -- INTRODUCTION, PAUL DOUGLASS in T. S. Eliot, Dante, and the Idea of 
> Europe (2011),  edited by Paul Douglass
>
> http://www.c-s-p.org/flyers/978-1-4438-2878-9-sample.pdf
>
> CR
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Sunday, January 6, 2013 8:52 AM:
>
> Well, largely, if not solely, I would suppose.
>
> CR
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> P <[log in to unmask]> wrote Friday, January 4, 2013 3:05 PM:
>
> //Could it be said that Eliot, Virgil-like, led Dante into the 20th 
> Century?//
> P. M.
>
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> The Poet in Transformation: Dantean Aesthetics in T.S. Eliot's The 
> Waste Land (2012)
> By Jamie Berlin
>
> Abstract
>
> Dante was a seminal influence in T. S. Eliot’s poetry. Many scholars 
> have acknowledged Eliot’s professed debt to Dante and have examined 
> Eliot’s explicit imitations of Dante; however, few have pinpointed 
> Dantean influences in non-explicit references to Dante, and few have 
> credited the influence of a Dantean progress narrative across Eliot’s 
> poem The Waste Land. This thesis broadly analyzes the principles of 
> Dante’s aesthetic in the poem while analyzing the Sibyl, the Hanged 
> Man, and the Prajapati parable for their relevance to Eliot’s 
> aesthetic theory. When Dantean aesthetics and close readings of The 
> Waste Land are compared with Eliot’s contemporary essays on art, a 
> fuller view of the aspects of Dante’s fundamental influence emerges. 
> In particular, the prominence of Dante in the sub-text of Eliot’s The 
> Waste Land reveals the nature of their shared aesthetic—that art is a 
> moral work by virtue of a spiritual transformation endured by the 
> artist, which involves both a sacrifice of self and a substantiation 
> of self. A deeper examination of Dante’s influence on T. S. Eliot 
> yields a vaster understanding of Eliot’s aesthetics while helping to 
> elucidate one of the central mysteries in Eliot’s theory of art, the 
> role of “personality.”
>
> http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1794&context=theses
>
> CR
>