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I sent this and resent it before because I never got it. Sorry if you
are getting it more than once.
N


For a first page on the renewal of Dante Criticism and its major first
author, see the following:
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/1768863?uid=3739712&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21101538591071


>>> Carrol Cox 01/05/13 3:56 PM >>> 
Gilson's book, I forget its title, is interesting for the scorn it piles
on those who try to make Dante mirror their own interests. 

Carrol 

> -----Original Message----- 
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On 
> Behalf Of Nancy Gish 
> Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2013 1:36 PM 
> To: [log in to unmask] 
> Subject: Re: Dantean Aesthetics in 'The Waste Land' 
> 
> Not likely: here are only three of many books on Dante in the early
20th 
> century published before Eliot's essays. There are more and easy to
find in 
> Google. 
> N 
> 
> The Poetry of Dante > of-dante> 
> 
> Contributors: 
> 
> Benedetto Croce 
> > ords> 
> Douglas Ainslie 
> > rds> 
> 
> Publisher: 
> Henry Holt and Company 
> > %20Company!AllWords> 1922 
> Subjects: 
> Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321--Criticism and Interpretation 
> > 01265-1321--Criticism%20and%20Interpretation!AllWords> 
> 
> 
> Read now 
> ...pres-ence of God. It has been said of Dante"Paradiso," that it
should not 
> have...expressive ofaspiration for I know not what of divine and
in­tangible, 
> a saying which...fear andhope, of distress and joy. But Dante, when 
> hecomposed the "Divine Comedy," was not inthis narrow condition of... 
> 18. 
> Dante, How to Know Him > how-to-know-him> 
> 
> Contributors: 
> 
> Alfred M. Brooks 
> > llWords> 
> 
> Publisher: 
> Bobbs-Merrill 
> > Merrill!AllWords> 1916 
> Subjects: 
> Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321--Criticism and Interpretation 
> > 01265-1321--Criticism%20and%20Interpretation!AllWords> 
> 
> 
> Read now > him> 
> ...forever. This, in brief, is the system onwhich Dante represents God
as 
> dealing with man­kind...well as the greatest.TWO WAYS OF READING THE 
> DIVINE COMEDYIn The Divine Comedy Dante relates an imagina­tive 
> experience, but... 
> 19. 
> Dante & Aquinas 
> 
> Contributors: 
> 
> Philip H. Wicksteed 
> > !AllWords> 
> 
> Publisher: 
> J. M. Dent & Sons 
> > 20%20Sons!AllWords> 1913 
> Subjects: 
> Dante Alighieri, 1265-1321 
> > 01265-1321!AllWords> 
> Thomas, Aquinas, Saint, 1225?-1274 
> > %2C%20Saint%2C%201225%3F-1274!AllWords> 
> Philosophy, Medieval 
> > val!AllWords> 
> 
> 
> Read now 
> ...particularcase it is), more happy than in Dante's treatmentof what
he 
> regards as the...namely, of the humanwill.Aquinas and Dante are
equally 
> emphatic in theirinsistence...are impossible, and thevery idea of
divine 
> justice perishes.Many passages in the "Comedy" will occur tothe
reader's 
> mind in which Dante dwells upon this 
> 
> 
> 
> >>> P 01/04/13 10:24 PM >>> 
> Could it be said that Eliot, Virgil-like, led Dante into the 20th
Century? 
> P. M. 
> 
> Chokh Raj wrote: 
> 
> 
> The Poet in Transformation: Dantean Aesthetics in T.S. Eliot's The
Waste 
> Land (2012) 
> 
> By Jamie Berlin 
> 
> Abstract 
> 
> 
> Dante was a seminal influence in T. S. Eliot’s poetry. Many scholars
have 
> acknowledged Eliot’s professed debt to Dante and have examined Eliot’s

> explicit imitations of Dante; however, few have pinpointed Dantean 
> influences in non-explicit references to Dante, and few have credited
the 
> influence of a Dantean progress narrative across Eliot’s poem The
Waste 
> Land. This thesis broadly analyzes the principles of Dante’s aesthetic
in the 
> poem while analyzing the Sibyl, the Hanged Man, and the Prajapati
parable 
> for their relevance to Eliot’s aesthetic theory. When Dantean
aesthetics and 
> close readings of The Waste Land are compared with Eliot’s
contemporary 
> essays on art, a fuller view of the aspects of Dante’s fundamental
influence 
> emerges. In part> Waste Land reveals the nature of their shared aesthetic—that art is a
moral 
> work by virtue of a spiritual transformation endured by the artist,
which 
> involves both a sacrifice of self and a substantiation of self. A
deeper 
> examination of Dante’s influence on T. S. Eliot yields a vaster
understanding 
> of Eliot’s aesthetics while helping to elucidate one of the central
mysteries in 
> Eliot’s theory of art, the role of “personality.” 
> 
> 
>
http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1794&context=these 
> s 
> 
> 
> CR 
> 
> 
> CR