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Nancy:  In any case, David's point is right, though "thin" is an understatement. The
> student wants to emphasize Eliot's desire for tradition and the past, but that is not
> in opposition to the his very open and self-conscious sense of being "new" . . . .

I haven't followed this thread, but on this point, I had always assumed that one of the essential features of "modernism" was specifically this search for a tradition. "To have gathered from the air a live tradition" (Pisan Cantos). It was this lust _not_ to be "new," to have penetrated through the clutter of the "new" to a lost reality,  that is one of the links between "modernism" and fascism. To speak of Eliot as "anti-modernist" is merely childish play with the many senses of the word "modern." 

Carrol