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Dear Nancy

- hope this connects

All Best

David
On 2 December 2012 18:18, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Dear David,
>
> Where did Nicholson say this? I'm on a new project, and I would very much
> like to read this in context. Can you send a citation?
> Thanks,
> Nancy
>
> >>> mikemail **12/02/12 12:46 PM >>>
>
> *Congratulations to Judith,David.  I'm sure the course was most
> gratifying.
>
> Mike*
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: David Boyd
>
> Sent: 12/02/12 01:32 PM
>
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> Subject: Re: T.S. Eliot's Anti-Modernism: Poetry and Tradition
>
>  Absolutely agree: I count myself very fortunate indeed many years ago to
> have been taught by the UK Open University's estimable team who compiled
> their original 'Twentieth Century Poetry' Course (D306), a key part of
> which was devoted to lengthy and wideranging discussion of 'Modernism' and
> all the uses and abuses and half-truths etc implied by this very imprecise
>  term, etc etc
>
> Jewel Spears Brooker a few years ago delivered a fascinating lecture to
> the UK TSE Society etc Little Gidding Festival, in which she reviewed all
> the similarities she saw  - as well as the obvious dichotomies - between
> Eliot and Wordsworth. From memory, one major similarity, she argued, lay in
> their shared propensity for strongly-dialectical argument and expression.
>
> Very strange bedfellows, on the face of it, but, beneath that, further
> illustration (to use Nancy's most helpful distinction) of Eliot's acute
> modernity, but not of his modernism. I know I'm always banging-on about
> Norman Nicholson, but I was somewhat, as they say, gobsmacked, to discover
> that he himself had made similar connections in 1948! - crudely pasted, as
> follows:-
>
>
> ........Mr Eliot had burst through the seams of a
>
> worn-out and shabby diction - this had been done before.
>
> Wordsworth had done the same thing for his generation by
>
> relating poetic diction to common speech. Moreover
>
> Wordsworth
>
>
>
> succeeded better than anyone before or since because
>
> he had a wonderful sense for those words which are so
>
> essential, so basic to the language and the emotions, that they
>
> scarcely change their significance from age to age. If you
>
> examine the poems like the
>
>
>
> *Matthew *and the *Lucy *series you
>
> will find that hardly a word he uses has become debased in
>
> meaning. Mr Eliot, however, related poetry not so much to
>
> common speech (though he made some experiments in that
>
> line in his dramatic works and monologues) but to that great
>
> commerce of language from which the modern reader draws
>
> his vocabulary - slang, journalism, literature and every other
>
> possible source. The result was that in these earlier poems he
>
> did not so much create a poetic diction as make it possible for
>
> other poets to create theirs......
>
> Sadly, the OU's *Twentieth Century Poetry* Course has long ago been
> subsumed by more general 'Literature' courses, but I was very pleased to
> note that similar things are afoot across the www - see attached, which my
> partner recently very much enjoyed (I drag her to Eliotic events, so that's
> made her want to learn more...). I did find it very odd, though, that Eliot
> was largely excluded - for being UnAmerican, presumably........
>
>
>
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