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https://www.coursera.org/#course/modernpoetry

relates

There are approaching two million participants on coursera, worldwide - a
most remarkable and commendable initiative, IMHO.

On 2 December 2012 16:09, Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>   I'm not sure what you mean. Penn was not offering a course for credit,
> so there's no possibility of awarding credit. This should have been and
> likely was crystal clear in the registration process. On a certificate,
> which is not an official transcript, it need only be noted that the
> course was a non-credit course or a course for CEU's (which latter it
> apparently wasn't). My point was only that the negative list is so
> lengthy that the positive achievement is understated and loses force, and
> that could have been (and as a former distance learning administrator I
> think should have been) easily rectified. Are you familiar with the
> specific course?
>
>
> On 12/2/2012 10:36 AM, Nancy Gish wrote:
>
> Penn would have to include these disclaimers to assure that legally the
> student had not acquired credits toward a degree. It's an acknowledgement
> of accomplishment of which she can be proud.
>
> Nancy
>
>  >>> Ken Armstrong **12/02/12 9:58 AM >>>
> Oh my, could they have decorated their certificate with any more
> negatives? I'm betting it was a good course from which your partner
> profited, but twenty lashes with a wet noodle to the U of Penn and its
> English Dept for failing to put it in evidence on the certificate.  After
> reading all the "not's" in the fine print, one is left to wonder what the
> "is's" are, or if in officialdom's eyes there are any. Typical. Where have
> I seen that reflex before?
>
> Ken A
>
> On 12/2/2012 5:32 AM, David Boyd wrote:
>
> Sadly, the OU's *Twentieth Century Poetry* Course has long ago been
> subsumed by more general 'Literature' courses, but I was very pleased to
> note that similar things are afoot across the www - see attached, which my
> partner recently very much enjoyed (I drag her to Eliotic events, so that's
> made her want to learn more...). I did find it very odd, though, that Eliot
> was largely excluded - for being UnAmerican, presumably........
>
>
> **
>
>
>