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Just as people tend to be extraverts or introverts, perhaps innate
personality traits lead them into either ascetism or affirmation. Eliot,
maybe, was a dyed-in-wool aesthete, but perhaps, especially post-Valerie,
mellowed considerably in his later years.

Your article was interesting, CR. I've always associated 'East Coker' with
Eliot at his finest: in a short poem, he evokes that which it took even
Thomas Hardy exceedingly many more words to celebrate: it's a masterpiece
of precise conciseness, yet such effective and reflective observation of
ancestral agrarian village existence.

To me, but I don't think to the author of the article, the image of the
dance is syonymous with and inseparable from that of Yeats - particularly
eg the last stanza of 'Among Schoolchildren' .Whether this was deliberate
on Eliot's part, or just a case of two great visionaries seeing the same
thing, I'm not too sure of, though.

Happy Christmas Day !!





On 24 December 2012 18:44, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> "there we have been"
>
> "The inner freedom from the practical desire,
> The release from action and suffering, release from the inner
> And the outer compulsion, yet surrounded
> By a grace of sense, a white light still and moving,
> Erhebung without motion, concentration
> Without elimination"
>
> a foretaste of paradise
>
> CR
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________________
>
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Sunday, December 23, 2012 8:30 AM:
>
> I was disappointed in the article you sent, David, on Eliot's Affirmative
> Way. In the first para itself there are three glaring
> distortions/misperceptions, one in each argument. The progress of thought,
> for instance, is from EC III to EC V and not in the reverse order. //Nor
> are epiphanical experiences as meaningless as "disturbing the dust ..."// The half a (mis)quotation "We had the experience but ..." fructifies in
> the other half which is ignored. And the point about the failure to find
> grace in ordinary experience is fallacious. Here is my answer by way of an
> article.
> The "East Coker" Dance in T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets: An Affirmation of
> Place and Time
> By Karey Perkins
> http://www.kareyperkins.com/papers/eliot.html
>
> CR
>
> David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote Saturday, December 22, 2012 4:55 AM:
>
> In case of any interest, please see the attached. [two attachments]
>
> On 22 December 2012 01:46, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I have always been disappointed at the lack of attention garnered by the
> Inklings compared to Yeats & Joyce.
> P. M.
>
> David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Interesting topic, thanks, CR.
>
> Haven't read it in full, but curious, possibly, that the profound
> influence of the thinking of an Eliot contemporary, Charles Williams, both
> upon Eliot and many others, regarding negativity and affirmation isn't
> mentioned, and neither seems to be relevant religious aspects of 4Q
>
> Prof. Grevel Lindop near Manchester UK is presently working on a biography
> of Charles Williams.
>
>
>
> On 21 December 2012 16:11, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> "And we thank Thee that darkness reminds us of light."
>
> The via negativa of 'The Waste Land'
>
> The Aristotelian Mr. Eliot: Structure and Strategy in 'The Waste Land'
> By Timmerman, John H.
> Yeats Eliot Review, Vol. 24, No. 2
> Summer 2007
>
>
> http://www.questia.com/library/1G1-201711531/the-aristotelian-mr-eliot-structure-and-strategy
>
> CR
>
>   ------------------------------
> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:26 PM:
>
> T.S. Eliot
> O Light Invisible
> From The Rock
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBGXU37Ch58
>
> CR
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>