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Glad it's of interest, Nancy.

- sure it all relates to an increasingly-very significant, although (too?)
close  era, albeit that it encroaches onto some of  my own youthful,
living-but-uncomprehending- at-the-time personal experiences: eg, I once
was late for- and missed-  a Folk Club session that was held within  the
BBC, Portland Place, at which the main performer had been one Sandy Denny -
(with hindsight)...sob greatly !! ...as they say, but Sandy Denny as she
was then wasn't remotely like Sandy Denny as she's been revered since then.


On 24 November 2012 15:35, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> David,
>
> This is fascinating stuff. Thanks. I've printed out the other pieces you
> sent also and want to read through them.
> Nancy
>
> >>> David Boyd **11/24/12 7:50 AM >>>
>
> Thanks for the links, CR - most interesting indeed, but a preliminary
> whizz through the content of the MacKay book seems to paint a rather
> different picture to that which I'd imagined. For example, there seems to
> be no mention of the St. Anne's Society, based at St Annes Church in Soho,
> that linked eg Eliot; Dorothy L. Sayers; Charles Williams; Bro. George
> Every with the clergy of that Church. Nor does there seem to be any
> acknowledgement of the influence of the aforementioned bunch upon Eliot,
> plus that of eg, Michael Roberts and Anne Ridler and E Martin Browne. For
> example, Eliot was godfather to one of Roberts' sons (Helen Sutherland was
> his other godparent).
>
> This is still, it seems, very uncharted academic territory. Grevel Lindop,
> former Prof. of English at Manchester UK Uni is presently researching a
> biography of Charles Williams (who died in 1946 aged only 58), and I'll
> certainly notify him of that  link to the full MacKay book.
>
> Attached is an account from a UK poet who lived through it all !
>
> Regards
>
> David
> On 24 November 2012 02:00, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>   MODERNISM AND WORLD WAR II
>> By Marina MacKay
>> Cambridge University Press, 2007
>>
>> foreword
>>
>> The Second World War marked the beginning of the end of literary
>> modernism in Britain. However, this late period of modernism and its
>> response to the War have not yet received the scholarly attention they
>> deserve. In the first full-length study of modernism and the Second World
>> War, Marina MacKay offers historical readings of Virginia Woolf, Rebecca
>> West, T. S. Eliot, Henry Green and Evelyn Waugh set against the dramatic
>> background of national struggle and transformation. In recovering how these
>> major authors engaged with other texts of their time – political
>> discourses, mass and middlebrow culture – this study reveals how the Second
>> World War brought to the surface the underlying politics of modernism’s
>> aesthetic practices. Through close analyses of the revisions made to
>> modernist thinking after 1939, MacKay establishes the significance of this
>> persistently neglected phase of modern literature as a watershed moment in
>> twentieth-century literary history.
>>
>> Marina MacKay is Assistant Professor of English at Washington University
>> in St. Louis.
>>
>> -----
>>
>> CONTENTS
>> Introduction: Modernism beyond the Blitz 1
>> 1 Virginia Woolf and the pastoral patria 22
>> 2 Rebecca West’s anti-Bloomsbury group 44
>> 3 The situational politics of Four Quartets 71
>> 4 The neutrality of Henry Green 91
>> 5 Evelyn Waugh and the ends of minority culture
>>
>> -----
>>
>> an excerpt from 'Introduction: Modernism beyond the Blitz'
>>
>> The narrator of Rebecca West’s shellshock novel The Return of the Soldier (1918)
>> even states outright the link between textual crisis and the war in
>> progress when she describes her soldier’s insanity as ‘a triumph over the
>> limitations of language which prevent the mass of men from making explicit
>> statements about their spiritual relationships’. The soldier of the novel’s
>> title has returned from the Front having forgotten his entire adult life,
>> and the political implications of his ‘triumph over the limitations of
>> language’ could not be starker when his madness represents his wholesale
>> rejection of pre-war male privilege as feudal landowner, commercial
>> imperialist and breadwinning husband. More canonical intersections of
>> linguistic crisis, war damage and social protest could obviously be found
>> in the predicament of Woolf ’s Septimus Smith and Eliot’s nerve-wracked
>> residents of The Waste Land, in post-war texts whose formal modernity
>> arises from the erosions that they undertake of traditional distinctions
>> between public and private spheres, war front and home front, between
>> conventionally historical events and the painfully permeable psychic life.
>> Woolf ’s experiments at the really subjective end of free indirect
>> discourse in the rendering of the warravaged Septimus Smith (Mrs Dalloway
>> is the first of her novels written in what became her characteristic style) and
>> Eliot’s spasmodic, syncopated verse in the passages of The Waste Landthat deal with similarly broken homecomings (‘What are you thinking of?
>> What thinking? What? / . . . I think we are in rats’ alley / Where the dead
>> men lost their bones’) make it inviting to connect the Great War’s causes
>> and effects to the emergence of new textual forms.
>>
>> After all, it was the First World War that had showed the agonising
>> incommensurability of the old realist historiography of decisive battles,
>> victory and defeat, with the shapeless and essentially unbounded damage
>> that war inflicts. War had ceased to look formal, was no longer believably
>> contained by the sporting discourse, gendered and class-bound, of winners
>> and losers. That uniquely modern lesson about the amorphousness of the war
>> experience surely stands behind the argument made by one seminal feminist
>> essay on war studies, that we have to think ‘beyond the exceptional,
>> marked event, which takes place on a specifically militarized front or in
>> public and institutionally defined arenas, to include the private domain and
>> the landscape of the mind’.
>>
>> http://m.friendfeed-media.com/53ba541ea5a32513e02b884a8e88172dfcdf0090
>>
>> Chapter 3, 'The situational politics of Four Quartets', is an
>> eye-opener.
>>
>> CR
>>
>>   ------------------------------
>>
>> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Thursday, November 22, 2012 1:35
>> PM:
>>
>>   THE VORTEX OF WORLD WAR II:
>> EZRA POUND AND T.S ELIOT’S
>> POETIC TREATMENT OF
>> WARTIME
>> By Charles Boyd Bax
>>  August 2010
>>
>> Abstract
>>
>> This thesis is an examination of the poetry written by Ezra Pound and
>> T.S. Eliot during World War II. The works that I focus on are Pound’s The
>> Pisan Cantos and Eliot’s Four Quartets. I will go about this examination
>> by applying the vortex, as a literary term and critical tool, to these two
>> works of poetry.  The structure of the vortex is a swirling outer turbine
>> held together by a calm center.  The vortex was coined as a literary
>> term during the British avant-garde movement, Vorticism.  Ezra Pound was a
>> prominent participant in this movement that occurred in the early twentieth
>> century.  After Vorticism ended, Pound continued to write about the vortex
>> as a literary term.  Eliot, though never a Vorticist, was familiar with the
>> concept of the vortex and directly uses the term in Four Quartets.  The
>> application of the vortex will show how Pound and Eliot organized their
>> social, political, and artistic situations at the time of World War II.
>>
>>
>> http://etd.lib.clemson.edu/documents/1285790258/Bax_clemson_0050M_10865.pdf
>>
>> CR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>