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Thanks, CR.
Peter

Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>The book should be with me within a week and I should be with you on it soon. 
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>And thanks, Peter, for bringing up the subject. I'll try to find what Dame Gardner said on it. 
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>Regards,
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>  CR
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>Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Wednesday, November 14, 2012 10:33 AM:
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>Incidentally, 
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>T.S. Eliot and the Language of Poetry (Studies in Modern Philology)
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>By Ferenc Takacs 
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>http://www.amazon.com/Language-Poetry-Studies-Modern-Philology/dp/9630553244
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>I'd urge my library to acquire it for me, or help me access it. 
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>CR
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>Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote Wednesday, November 14, 2012 9:53 AM:
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>But Dame Philology is our Queen still, Quick to comfort Truth-loving hearts in their mother tongue (to report On the miracles She has wrought In the U.K., the O.E.D. Takes fourteen tomes): She suffers no evil, And a statesman still, so Her grace prevent, may keep a treaty, A poor commoner arrive at The Proper Name for his cat. -- W. H. Auden, "A Short Ode to a Philologist" 
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>http://lonelyphilologist.blogspot.com/2010/06/showing-my-students-how-to-embed.html
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>CR 
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>P <[log in to unmask]> wrote Wed, Nov 14, 2012 9:10:12 AM:  
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>One obvious place to start would be the homage to Dante in Little Gidding, but perhaps that is a special case because it is such direct stylistic creation, outstanding though it be. A more appropriate example is MITC which uses the Anglo-Saxon and medieval rhythms of works like Everyman. That was quite deliberate as Eliot himself said. I believe Helen Gardner remarked on it more fully somewhere.
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>Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
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>That facility and through that facility getting at the essence of things. 
>Thus, for instance, not merely learning Sanskrit but through it 
>getting at the heart of ancient Indian wisdom. 
>The marvel ceases not.
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>CR
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>Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]> wrote Mon, Nov 12, 2012 8:35:53 AM:
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>Mark Twain once said, "My philological studies have satisfied me that a gifted person ought to learn English (barring spelling and pronouncing) in thirty hours, French in thirty days, and German in thirty years."
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>Eliot seems to have learned them all, all at once, not to mention Latin and Sanskrit.
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>I don't recall our having discussed Eliot's facility with language, which it seems to me to have been quite phenomenal and one of the things that makes his work so incredibly attractive. I know it is gauche on this list to say nice things about Eliot, but there it is. I've done it and I'm very glad.  
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