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It may well be that it's something that can't be scientifically proven, not that we're in the business of science, but if we lend any credence to Eliot's concept of auditory imagination, and I think a few of us do, then what could better facilitate our plunge into the deepest dimensions of the unconscious than a range of languages, esp. the ancient ones like Sanskrit which radiate all kinds of sounds for us, with and without meaning even if we don't know the exact sounds that were originally used. Our attempts at providing sounds are creative acts in them selves.
P. M.

"Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>I've been thinking but I haven't come up with any way the Eliot's facility
>with foreign languages actually helped his writing poetry in English. 
>
>As for his use of the foreign phrases though he often combined several
>languages rather close together. Mostly epigraphs but then there is the
>closing of TWL.  The quickest switch must be in the later dedication to
>Verdenal where he has English and French in the first line and then goes on
>to a quotation from Dante in the Italian.
>
>It seems to me to the by using the languages so close together E. was
>striving to show a universality in life.
>
>Regards,
>   Rick Parker